New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, February 17, 2017

Over 6.3 million records are available to search this Findmypast Friday including;

Norfolk Bishop’s transcripts contain over 647,000 records. Each entry includes an image of the original document and a transcript of the vital details. The amount of information found in the transcript will depend on the age and condition of the original document although most will include your ancestor’s name, baptism year, baptism place and the names of their parent’s. Images may reveal additional information such as your ancestor’s birth date, father’s occupation and the name of the officiating minister.

Norfolk Bishop’s Transcripts Marriages contains Over 157,000 records. Each record includes a transcript that will reveal your ancestor’s birth year, date of marriage, place of marriage and the name of their spouse as well as an image of the original document. Images may reveal further information about your ancestor’s marriage, such as the couple’s occupations, fathers’ names, and the names of any witnesses.

Search over 434,000 Bishop’s transcripts of Norfolk burials to discover your ancestor’s final resting place. Transcripts will also reveal when they died and their age at death. Images of original documents may reveal additional information such as the name of the minister who performed the ceremony, your ancestor’s date of death and, occasionally, their cause of death.

Norfolk Electoral Registers 1832-1915 contains over 4.5 million records. Each entry includes an image of the original register and a transcript of the facts listed. Transcripts will list your ancestor’s name, the place they registered, the district and the year they were registered. Images will provide additional information such as you’re their address and the type of property they owned or rented.

British Royal Navy Allotment Declarations 1795-1852 contains over 485,000 records held by The National Archives at Kew. Each record includes a transcripts that will reveal your ancestor’s rank, the year of their declaration, their pay book number, their relationship the recipient and any additional remarks. Images may reveal where and when they were married, the names, ages, and baptism dates of their children, the allotted individuals residence, the allotment date and where payable. Prior to 1853, men joined the navy on a short-term basis and service records were not created until after 1853. Allotment Declarations are an excellent way to trace the careers of your earlier naval ancestors.

Over 104,000 records have been added to our collection of Victoria Births. These civil registration records will reveal your ancestors birth place, birth year, parent’s names and registration number. The entire collection now contains over 1.9 million records spanning the years 1837 t0 1917. During this period, Victoria’s birth certificates – as well as marriage and death certificates – were the most detailed of all Australian colonies’. Ordered copies of original certificates may contain additional information such as the parents’ ages, place of birth, marriage details and the details of any previous children.

Over 1.6 million articles and 13 brand new titles have been added to our collection of historic British newspapers this month. The new additions cover the North West and South East of England a number of Scottish counties, Nottinghamshire and Bournemouth. The new Scottish titles include the Haddingtonshire Courier, Linlithgowshire Gazette, Ross-shire Journal, Rothesay Chronicle, Kinross-shire Advertiser, Peeblesshire Advertiser and the Scottish Referee.

Discover Two of our Nation’s Important Repositories in Madison, Wisconsin

ARLINGTON, VA, 15 FEBRUARY 2017—The National Genealogical Society (NGS) opens registration today for family historians to participate in on-site orientations in genealogical research at the Wisconsin Historical Society (WHS) Library and Archives and the Max Kade Institute for German-American Studies, 24-28 July 2017.

The WHS Library and Archives’ genealogy and history collections are among our nation’s most extensive repositories and reflect the diversity of the people who have lived or passed through its territory. Native American tribes, French-Canadians, Northern Europeans—primarily from Germany and Norway—African Americans, Asians, and Hispanics have called Wisconsin home. The state has also seen the rise and diminution of miners, loggers, and railroad workers, and once held Confederate prisoners of war during the Civil War. Dedicated to preserving history, the Society’s more than four million records extend beyond Wisconsin to the rest of the United States and to Canada. Its Draper collection’s 491 volumes (ca. 1775-1815) concentrates on the area known as “Trans-Allegheny West,” including the western Carolinas and Virginia, some portions of Georgia and Alabama, the entire Ohio River valley, and parts of the Mississippi River valley. Its collection of newspapers, journals, magazines, and union and guilds publications from around the country is only surpassed by the Library of Congress. The WHS also serves as Wisconsin State Archives that includes state, county, and local government records. Land deeds, naturalization records, tax rolls, and court documents are just some of the original records that genealogists can access at the Archives.

Family historians with ancestors from Germany will be especially interested in the Max Kade Institute’s robust collection of German-American newspapers, letters, diaries, and church and business records. The Institute is also an excellent resource for locating historic German-language, European towns and villages.

Space is limited for this new NGS research trip. Experienced, BCG certified genealogists will introduce and mentor a group of 20 individuals as they explore the wealth of data at both facilities. Participants will also have ample time to conduct their own personal research during this four-day trip in Madison, Wisconsin, 24-28 July 2017.

Research consultants Rev. David McDonald, DMin, CGSM, and Patricia Walls Stamm, CG, CGLSM, will insure that your introduction to these institutions is both productive and enriching.

The trip includes:

  • Guidance from leading experts
  • Online orientation
  • Meet and greet on Monday afternoon at the hotel
  • Four days of research
  • Orientation at the repositories
  • Personal research consultations with group leaders throughout the trip
  • Four nights at the Lowell Center, including daily continental breakfast and free internet in rooms
  • Fees, taxes, and gratuities

Make your reservation quickly so you don’t miss out on this research trip. Space is limited to only 20 individuals. To make your reservation or to learn more, visit http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/conferences_events/research_trips/wi_research_trip

About the National Genealogical Society

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, the highest standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

The Ohio Genealogical Society Enters Partnership with Findmypast to Benefit OGS Members!

BELLVILLE, OH 13 February 2017—The Ohio Genealogical Society (OGS) has made a special arrangement with Findmypast (FMP), one of the leading genealogical records companies, to provide OGS members a free, one-year subscription to Findmypast US and Canada collection.

Members can use this opportunity to extend their own FMP US and Canada subscriptions beyond their current expiration date. Also available to OGS members is a one-year subscription to Findmypast World collection at a significantly discounted rate.

Current and new OGS members are encouraged to visit the OGS website for additional details and to take advantage of this limited-time offer.

The Ohio Genealogical Society Enters Partnership with Findmypast to Benefit OGS Members!

Findmypast is an international leader in online family history and genealogical research with customers and operations in the United States, United Kingdom, Ireland, and Australia. Its searchable online archive includes more than two billion family history records—from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers, the Periodical Source Index (PERSI), and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a valuable resource for building family trees and making family connections through its historical records and advanced search tools.

About Ohio Genealogical Society

Founded in 1959, the Ohio Genealogical Society is the largest state genealogical society in the United States. Its mission is to meet the educational needs of its members and the general public through the acquisition, preservation, and dissemination of genealogical and historical information. More details can be found online at www.ogs.org.

OldNews USA Wins Top Honors at RootsTech 2017 Innovator Showdown

OldNews USA Wins Top Honors at RootsTech 2017 Innovator Showdown

Old news, it seems, is actually “new” news. Very innovative news in fact. Today at RootsTech, the world’s largest family history technology conference, OldNews USA took top honors in the 2017 Innovator Showdown, walking away with $95,000 in cash and in-kind prizes. OldNews is an android app designed to help users quickly discover their family in historical US newspapers. The app uses the Library of Congress “Chronicling America” collection of more than 11 million newspaper pages from 1789 to 1922 to deliver its results.

In front of a crowd of close to 14,000 live and online viewers, the six RootsTech Innovator Showdown finalists battled for $199,000 in cash and prizes and bragging rights in the rapidly-growing, multi-billion dollar family history industry. An experienced amateur genealogist, Bill Nelson of Auburn, Massachusetts, designed the program as a solution to tedious, difficult online newspaper searches. The OldNews USA app was designed to simplify and streamline the search process.

Using keywords, users can look for newspaper accounts of a person or topic with the option to look at articles of historical events. In a person search, you type names and dates into your mobile device and choose a location on Google Maps which produces a list of newspapers in the targeted geographic area for a time period. It brings up images of the actual newspapers with the name or event you are seeking highlighted so you can quickly locate it on the page. Images can be enlarged for easier access to detail.

Nelson is a software developer by trade. “I was new to android and needed something to practice on. I had felt the pain points of newspaper research and thought ‘this would be a good project,’” he said. Initially he developed the app for his own use, then realizing it could help other researchers, he expanded it into a mobile app.

OldNews is compatible with Android devices, but Nelson is working to create an app for IOS devices and computers. With his winnings, he can now get business and technological assistance to accelerate development. While OldNews USA is designed to search US newspapers, he hopes to adapted the app for other countries.

The 5 finalists were whittled down from more than 40 applicants from the US and Europe. Each took three minutes to convince the panel of five judges and live audience that their product was deserving of a chunk of the $190,000 in cash and prizes.

The major sponsors of the Innovator Showdown this year included Amazon Web Services (AWS), Kickstarter Seed FundSorenson Legacy Foundation, and others.

After each presentation, there was a four-minute question and answer period between each contestant and the judges. The judges then selected the top three winners, and the viewing audience selected the People’s Choice Award winner.

With $190,000 in cash and in-kind prizes and services from sponsors at stake—an increase of nearly $100,000 from the original projection—the pressure, tension, and energy of the event was tremendous.

2017 RootsTech Showdown Winners
  • First Place Judges’ Choice ($90,000 cash, AWS credits, and an investment from Kickstart Seed Fund), Bill Nelson of OldNews USA.
  • Second Place Judges’ Choice ($44,000 cash and AWS credits), The Qroma tag mobile app for embedding stories into pictures, tagging them by voice commands, and making the data accessible on various platforms.
  • Third Place Judges’ Choice Award ($26,000 cash and AWS credits), Louis Kessler, Double Match Triangulator, an app to help sort DNA matches into groups of relatives.
  • People’s Choice ($25,000 cash and AWS credits), Kindex, an app designed to help users create searchable, shareable archives of family letters and other documents using tags to help users easily locate information.
Emberall was the other finalist. It provides a method to capture and store pictures and videos creating an accessible archive.

The judges for the final round included Alan Doan, CEO of Missouri Star Quilt Company, John Richards, Founder and CEO of Startup Ignition, Kenyatta Berry, host of The Genealogy Road Show, Thomas MacEntee, founder of High-Definition Genealogy, and Dalton J. Wright, partner in Kickstart Seed Fund.

The Innovator Showdown, now in its third year, was designed to foster innovation in the family history industry.

Find and share this news release online at the FamilySearch Newsroom

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, February 10, 2017

Over 31 million new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

Discover your Catholic ancestors from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in this first record release from an agreement we’ve made with the Roman Catholic Church to digitise their unique records for the first time ever. These baptism records list your ancestor’s name, their parent’s names, and their residence at the time.

Additional information that you may find from the images include place of birth, sponsors, minister who performed the ceremony, and notice of marriage. Catholic priests were charged with noting all vital events of their parishioners. If, for instance, a parishioner married outside her home parish, the priest who performed the marriage would contact her priest to confirm she was baptised and to share the details of her marriage, hence the marriage notice in the baptism register.

View a transcript and image of your ancestor’s marriage register from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. As well as details such as the couple’s names, and marriage date and location, you may also find dates and locations of the couples’ baptisms.

All our Philadelphia Roman Catholic Parish records are from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, covering Bucks County, Chester County, Delaware County, Montgomery County, and Philadelphia County. Originally formed as a diocese in 1808 by Pope Pius VII, it was made a metropolitan archdiocese in 1875. The Catholic Church has had a presence in the area since as far back as William Penn’s founding of the Province of Pennsylvania in 1681.

In this browse-only search, you can navigate through each of the 199 sacramental registers that make up the Philadelphia Roman Catholic Parish Registers, in their entirety, to discover all there is learn about your ancestor’s connections to the church.

Provided by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, these records include images from a variety of sources ranging from the late 1600s to the mid-1900s. Each result has both a transcript and an image of the source document (e.g. original registers, historical society publications, etc.).

This collection is part of a larger body of work that will be published on Findmypast over time. It is important to note that this may not be the only place to find births or baptisms—and there may be records included that are not births or baptisms — in this material from the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, rather these were the records that we were able to identify as largely composed of births and baptisms.

As well as details such as name, date of death and burial, parish and diocese, you may find information on your ancestor’s military service, age, birth date, or spouse and children. Some even include tombstone inscriptions.

Pennsylvanian marriage records ranging from the early 1600s to the late 1900s. You can view a transcript and the original image.

Gain an insight into your ancestor and the church they attended. Images can include lists of past ministers and those baptised and confirmed, as well as church histories. The lists of confirmations and communicants may also provide the names of parents and spouses.

These cards were created by the Army so if something happened to a local soldier, the newspaper wouldn’t have to scramble for the information. These records are particularly relevant in light of the fire at the National Archives and Records Administration in the 1970s when most World War II personnel files were destroyed.

As well as the typical information you would expect from a census (occupation, address, birth year, etc.), notes detailing the local priest’s opinion on your ancestor’s faith and dedication to the church let you find out if your ancestor was a good or bad Catholic.

See the record of your ancestor’s baptism. The amount of information in each record varies depending on the age of the record, its legibility, and the amount of information recorded by the parish priest at the time of the event. All England Roman Catholic parish records released this week are from the Birmingham and Westminster archdioceses.

View original burial registers to discover more about your ancestor. Every record includes a transcript and an image of the original sacramental register, while some provide additional information such as your ancestor’s parents’ names or burial plot.

Discover where and when your ancestor was married, along with witnesses’ names and the names of the married couple’s fathers.

Did your ancestor receive confirmation? Were they a benefactor of a parish? Explore thousands of Roman Catholic congregational records from Birmingham and Westminster to discover your ancestor’s relationship with his local parish.

Browse all 747 volumes of the Birmingham and Westminster Archdiocesan Archives from start to finish. The volumes span from 1657 to 1907, listing marriages, baptisms and births, burials, and congregational records including anniversary books, confirmation lists, parish diaries, and more.

Had no joy searching our US marriage records collection for your ancestor? We’ve just added 26,000,000 new records, so it’s definitely worth another look.