Month: June 2015

NEHGS Salutes the Nation’s Anniversary with FREE Access to the Great Migration Databases on AmericanAncestors.org


Family Historians May Commemorate Independence Day by Searching FREE on AmericanAncestors.org for America’s Earliest Settlers, July 1 through July 8

June 29, 2015—Boston, Massachusetts—In a salute to the anniversary of our nation’s independence, New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) is granting FREE access to all online searchable databases related to the Great Migration. A unique foundation of governance and religion was created by the 20,000 men, women, and children who crossed the Atlantic between 1620 and 1640, seeking opportunity and relief in New England, in the period known as the Great Migration. These are the Mayflower names, the Pilgrims, the Puritans, and the families that delight and provide rich insights for genealogists and family historians. Since 1988 NEHGS has undertaken the Great Migration Study Project, directed by Robert Charles Anderson and scheduled for completion in 2016. The results are open to the public to research FREE during the first week of July 2015 on its data-rich website AmericanAncestors.org.

A total of nine searchable databases comprise the Great Migration project on AmericanAncestors.org, consisting of thousands of records. Some content highlights include:

1: The Great Migration Begins

The first phase of the Great Migration Study Project attempts to identify and describe all those Europeans who settled in New England prior to the end of 1633. The date was chosen because of the steep increase in migration beginning in 1634 and continuing for the rest of that decade (see Robert Charles Anderson, “A Note on the Pace of the Great Migration,” The New England Quarterly 59 [1986]:406-07). As a rough estimate, about 15 percent of the immigrants to New England arrived in the fourteen years from 1620 to 1633, with the remaining 85 percent coming over in half as many years, from 1634 to 1640.

2: The Great Migration Newsletter

This database comprises Volumes 1 through 20 of the Great Migration Newsletter, published between 1990 and 2011. Each 32-page issue contains one or two feature articles, a column with editor’s comments, and a review of recent literature on the Great Migration. Each issue also contains a section with detailed coverage of one of the towns settled during the Great Migration, or of a specific critical record, or group of records.

3: The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Volumes I—VII, A-Y
(7 separate databases)

From 1620 to 1633, only a few hundred people stepped on the shores of New England in any given year. But all of a sudden in 1634 the trend surged upward and as many as 2,500 people immigrated in 1634 and again in 1635. In May 1634, the population of Massachusetts doubled in just one month, and when comparing immigration in 1634 and 1635 to immigration in 1633 and earlier, there was a tenfold jump in annual immigration.

These volumes covering surnames beginning with A through Y, complete a series documenting the watershed years of 1634 and 1635. They trace families and individuals immigrating to New England during those two years – a time of rapid migration and settlement.

Each alphabetical entry for a family or individual includes:

• Place of origin, if known

• Date and ship on which they arrived in New England, if known

• Earliest known record of the individual or family

• First residence and subsequent residences, when known

• Return trips to their country of origin, whether temporary or permanent

• Bibliographical information such as birth, death, marriage(s), children, and other important family relationships, church memberships, and civil and military offices held

The full introduction to these seven volumes is available for download as a pdf file. The introduction includes a description of the methodology used to create the sketches as well as thorough descriptions of the sources used.

The database provides an index to the sketches of 219 Great Migration individuals, and the 7,192 name, 2,040 place, and 249 ship name references contained within those sketches. The images of the original book pages are available from the search results pages.

These Great Migration databases from NEHGS will be open with FREE access to the public beginning Wednesday, July 1, through Wednesday, July 8. Registration at AmericanAncestors.org is required as a FREE Guest Member to gain access to these valuable resources. Guest User accounts allow web visitors to use a limited suite of AmericanAncestors.org databases and access web content such as making purchases from the online store. Unlimited access to all 450+ million records and other benefits is through membership at NEHGS.

Family historians may start their search for ancestors who came to the country as part of the Great Migration at this site: AmericanAncestors.org/specials/fourth-of-july.

FEEFHS Conference offers Full German Research Track

For the first year FEEFHS is offering a full track focused on German genealogical research throughout the conference program. Starting with the basics of German family history research — language and handwriting, records, maps, and tools — and progressing to more advanced topics and specialty records such as guilds and family record books, individuals will be able to attend classes specific to German family history research throughout the 3-day conference. These classes will be taught by locally and nationally recognized instructors, Milan Pohontsch, Baerbel Johnson, and two instructors new to FEEFHS, FHL consultants Fritz Juengling and Kelsee Jackson.

The conference will be held August 12-15, 2015 at the Salt Lake Plaza Hotel in Salt Lake City, Utah, with pre-conference workshops beginning on August 11th. The program also offers instruction related to Hungarian Empire, Polish, German, Russian, Germans from Russia, and Jewish genealogical research, with expanded offerings in several areas for more advanced researchers. The research essentials track offers general topics for those just getting started with East European family history research. Interested parties may obtain complete information at feefhsworkshop.org.

The Foundation for Eastern European Family History Studies (FEEFHS) was founded in 1992 to provide access to genealogical resources and educational programs relating to Eastern European family history research. Additional information may be found at feefhs.org.

Fascinating New Convict Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

This week’s Findmypast Friday marks the release of over 240,000 fascinating Australian convict records, new additions to our collection of historic Irish newspapers, Irish Workhouse records from County Clare and Sligo as well as English parish records from the parish of Southfleet in North West Kent.

Australian Convict Records

Containing nearly 27,000 records, the Australia Convict Conditional and Absolute Pardons 1791-1867 list the details of convicts pardoned by the governor of New South Wales and date back to the earliest days of the colony. Pardons were generally handed out to convicts serving life sentences but in the earliest years of the colony the Governor had the power to grant both free and conditional pardons as rewards for good behaviour, for special skills or for carrying out special duties or tasks. Each record contains a transcript and an image of original documents. As well as listing the names of pardoned convicts, the records also include the name of the ship they arrived on, the term of the sentence they served, any additional notes, and details of their release.

New South Wales Registers of Convicts’ Applications to Marry 1825-1851 contains over 26,000 records. Convicts in Australian penal colonies were actually encouraged to marry as Governors believed that marriage and family life were good for both morality and stability. Convicts who did obtain the Governor’s permission to marry could apply for tickets of leave or pardons as well as assistance in establishing a household. In the early years of the colonies, many convicts married even if they had wives or husbands back home. Each record contains a transcript as well as an image of the original document. Registers list the convict’s name, the name of their spouse, their profession and the length of their sentence as well as the sip they arrived on and when they were given their freedom.

Containing over 188,000 records, Australia Convict ships 1786-1849 dates back the ships of First Fleet and include the details of some of the earliest convict settlers in New South Wales. The records are made up of five separate sets of musters and indents held by the State Records Authority of New South Wales. Indents records were used in the early settlements to keep track of the convict population while musters lists of who was on board a ship were taken at the port of embarkation. Each record contains a transcript and a black and white image of original documents. Indents can include a variety of information about individual convicts such as their native place, details of their offence and sentence, a physical description and details of their family members. Musters usually only give a name, date and place of trial and sentence. Musters were also taken after disembarkation.

Over 7,000 records have been added to our collection of Victoria Prison Registers 1855-1948. The new additions are taken from the Central Register of Female Prisoners, held by the Public Record Office Victoria. The register kept a record of prisoners that passed through Pentridge prison in Coburg, Victoria. Pentridge was built in 1850 and was the central prison in the Melbourne region from about 1860. Each record includes a transcripts and scanned image of the original registers and many include mug shot photographs of individual’s prisoners. They list fascinating details about not only the prisoners’ offences, sentences and incarceration, but also biographical information such as their name, date of birth, country of origin and occupation. Remarks on the register may also include the name of the ship on which the prisoner arrived if they were not born in Australia.

Irish Workhouse Records

Containing of over 9,000 records, the Sligo workhouse registers 1848-1859 consist of handwritten registers taken at the Sligo Union workhouse, one of three workhouses in the County Sligo. The records pre-date civil registration and will be a valuable resource to those with Sligo ancestors given the lack of 19th century census material available in Ireland. Each record includes a transcript and an image of the original document. The registers list the names of new arrivals and details including their age, occupation, religion, any illnesses or infirmities, family members, local parish, their condition on arrival (usually describing clothes or cleanliness) and when they were discharged or died.

Containing over 63,000 records, the Clare Poor Law Unions Board of Guardians Minute Books cover the Kilrush and Ennistymon unions, two of eight poor law unions located in County Clare. The Board of Guardians oversaw the running of the poor law unions as well as the hiring of teachers, staff and contractors. Guardians were elected by those who paid the taxes that funded poor law relief. The books recorded weekly reports on the number of inmates, new arrivals, births, deaths and discharges. They also recorded expenditures including food supplies and salaries as well as the number of inmates receiving medical treatments. Each record contains a transcript and an image of the original handwritten minutes.

Irish newspapers

Over 308,000 new articles have been added to our collection of historic Irish newspapers. Substantial additions have been made to Saunder’s News-Letter, a title that dates all the way back to 18th century Ireland and now contains nearly 950,000 fully searchable articles.

North West Kent Parish Records Baptisms

Over 4,000 new records have been added to our collection of North West Kent parish records, nearly 2,000 baptisms, over 500 marriages and 1,500 burials transcribed by the North West Kent family history society are now available to search. The new additions cover the parish of Southfleet and each record consists of a transcript of the original source material.

Remember to check our dedicated Findmypast Fridays page every week to keep up to date with the latest new additions.

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online genealogy. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field of family history and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Mocavo, Genes Reunited, The British Newspaper Archive amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over two billion family history records, from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and doing detailed historical research.

In April 2003 Findmypast was the first to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States.

Findmypast Community Edition Now Available to U.S. Libraries

  • Findmypast, a global leader in family history, announces the availability of a library edition within the United States
  • Provides access for libraries, archives, and other organizations to billions of records from England, Ireland, Wales, Scotland, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States
  • Free, no obligation, 90-day trial available

Salt Lake City – June 25, 2015 – Findmypast, a global leader in family history, announced today the official release of their product for libraries and organizations in the United States. The Findmypast Library Edition gives library access to billions of records from Findmypast’s wide array of collections from the United States, Ireland, England, Wales, Scotland, and other areas of the world. Collection highlights include:

· Largest online collection of parish records from the United Kingdom

· Exclusive access to the new PERiodical Source Index (now with images)

· Most comprehensive Irish family history records in the world

Amongst the billions of records now available to library patrons is the new PERiodical Source Index (PERSI). PERSI, a popular tool used by genealogists, includes more than 2.5 million indexed entries from thousands of genealogical and local history publications. For the first time, images of articles have been included in the collection – with more being added on a regular basis.

“We are delighted to bring the best resource for British and Irish family history to America’s library market,” said Annelies van den Belt, CEO of Findmypast.

The Library Edition provides tools for patrons to work in tandem with a library’s subscription and at home. Individual user accounts allow patrons to build their own family tree, save records from the library’s subscription, and continue working on their family tree. Library patrons will also have access to Findmypast’s Hints, which aids in the discovery of records from their own family tree.

Librarians can contact librarysales@findmypast.com for further information, pricing, and to start a free 90-day free trial of the product.

About Findmypast

Findmypast is an international leader in online family history and genealogy research with customers and operations in the United States, United Kingdom, Ireland and Australia. Its searchable online archive includes over two billion family history records, from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers, the Periodical Source Index (PERSI) and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and making family connections.

Findmypast has an unrivalled record of innovation in the field of family history, and works closely with the genealogy community, including local libraries, archives, societies, and other organizations from around the world, to preserve, digitize, and provide access to historical records. Findmypast’s historical records, advanced search tools and accurate data work together to help both professional

BCG Offers a Free Day of Skillbuilding Genealogy Lectures 9 October 2015 in Salt Lake City

Top genealogists Michael Hait, Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, Judy G. Russell, Michael Ramage, Elizabeth Shown Mills, and Thomas W. Jones will present six one-hour skillbuilding lectures at the Family History Library’s Main Floor Classroom in Salt Lake City Friday, October 9, 2015, between 9 AM and 5 PM. The annual lectures are free and open to the public, cosponsored by the Board for Certification of Genealogists and the Family History Library. The board is an independent certifying body and author of the updated 2014 Genealogy Standards.

Times, topics, and speakers:

  • 9:00 – “What Is ‘Reasonably Exhaustive Research’?” Michael Hait, CG
  • 10:15 – “The Art of Negative Space Research: Women,” Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG
  • 11:30 – “After the Courthouse Burns: Rekindling Family History Through DNA,” Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL
  • 1:30 – “Forensic Genealogy Meets the Genealogical Proof Standard,” Michael Ramage, JD, CG
  • 2:45 – “Margaret’s Baby’s Father and the Lessons He Taught Me (about Illegitimacy, Footloose Males, Burned Counties & More)” Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG, FNGS, FUGA
  • 4:00 – “When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion?” Thomas W. Jones, PhD, CG, CGL, FASG, FNGS, FUGA

“Whether you attend one skillbuilding lecture or all six, you will learn more about how to apply sound methodology to your genealogical research,” said President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom. “The Board for Certification of Genealogists strives to foster public confidence in genealogy by promoting an attainable, uniform standard of competence and ethics. Education is part of this mission.”

For questions or more information contact office@BCGcertification.org.

CG, Certified Genealogist, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluations. The board name is a trademark registered in the US Patent and Trademark Office.

Extreme Genes—America’s Family History Radio—and NEHGS Announce New Broadcast Collaboration


NEHGS Chief Genealogist David Allen Lambert to Co-Host Show Segment with Extreme Genes Founder Scott Fisher

June 16, 2015—Salt Lake City, Utah, and Boston, Massachusetts—Extreme Genes, America’s Family History Radio Show, and New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) today jointly issued an announcement of their collaboration and innovative sharing in the broadcast production of the very popular Extreme Genes program.

Extreme Genes Radio founder, producer, and host Scott Fisher announced that NEHGS Chief Genealogist David Allen Lambert will join Extreme Genes as a regular on the weekly program, co-hosting a segment simultaneously from Boston, Massachusetts—headquarters of NEHGS, the founding genealogical society in America. Lambert, a frequent guest on the program since it began in early 2014, is a frequent speaker and lecturer on the national genealogical conference circuit.

“We are extremely pleased to announce this new Extreme Genes collaboration and I am delighted to have David Allen Lambert join the team to deliver the best radio listening experience possible for passionate genealogists everywhere,” stated Fisher. “David is a talented genealogist, historian, and commentator—and has the perfect style and fit for the future of our growing broadcasts,” he added.

David Lambert has been on the staff of NEHGS since 1993 and is the organization’s Chief Genealogist. He is an internationally recognized speaker on the topics of genealogy and history. His genealogical expertise includes New England and Atlantic Canadian records of the 17th through 21st century, military records, DNA research, and Native American and African American genealogical research in New England. Lambert has published many articles in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, the New Hampshire Genealogical Record, Rhode Island Roots, The Mayflower Descendant, and American Ancestors magazine.

He has also published A Guide to Massachusetts Cemeteries (NEHGS, 2009). He is an elected Fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, a life member of the New Hampshire Society of the Cincinnati, and also the tribal genealogist for the Massachuset-Punkapoag Indians of Massachusetts.

Fisher, a Connecticut native, has been in radio since his youth, and he has spent three decades of spare time as a passionate “roots sleuth.” A long-time morning radio show host in major U.S. urban markets, he is the author of New York City Methodist Marriages, 1785-1893 (Picton Press, 1994). He has also been published in the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society Journal (April 2004), and Catholic Ancestor, Journal of the Catholic Family History Society of England (June 1996). His ten books on the families of both his and his wife’s ancestors, written over 25 years, fill the better part of a shelf in the Fisher family room library. Fisher was featured on People.com in April 2015 for finding the next-of-kin of a murder victim whose remains were recently found after 32 years.

Extreme Genes, America’s Family History Radio Show, is a broadcast and podcast radio production. The syndicated radio version currently reaches audiences in ten states, while the podcast is a weekly feature on The Mormon Channel, iHeartRadio, iTunes, Spreaker Radio and Podcast, Stitcher Radio, Tune-in Radio, and YouTube. A free Extreme Genes podcast app for Android and iPhone was recently released.

The podcast version of Episode #91 of Extreme Genes Radio, with the first appearance by David Allen Lambert as segment co-host, may be found beginning Tuesday, June 16, on the show’s website at ExtremeGenes.com

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR Tuesday, June 16: “Truth or Fiction? Unraveling a Family Yarn”

George Teeling came from Ireland to Chicago in the 1800s. Like many ancestors, he left a story that made his descendants wonder. How much of it was true?

The Board for Certification of Genealogists will present a webinar on this subject free to the public at 8:00 PM EDT 16 June 2015. Teresa Steinkamp McMillin, CG, will outline how research in a wide variety of sources revealed the even more fascinating truth about George – and how it can provide ideas for how to deal with our own tale-bearing research subjects.

Seating is limited for this webinar. Please register early and sign in early to avoid disappointment.

The board is an independent certifying body and author of the updated 2014 Genealogy Standards.

Teresa Steinkamp McMillin, CG, specializes in German-American and Midwest research, as well as reading German script. She has been interested in genealogy since she was a child and is a multi-year attendee of the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research and the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy. A member of the Association of Professional Genealogists, the National Genealogical Society, and many local genealogical societies, she also serves as webmaster for the Northwest Suburban Genealogy Society in Arlington Heights, Illinois. Recently, Teresa published Guide to Hanover Military Records, 1514-1866, on Microfilm at the Family History Library.

“We are pleased to offer this informative webinar,” said BCG president Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG. “The Board for Certification of Genealogists strives to foster public confidence in genealogy by promoting an attainable, uniform standard of competence and ethics. Educating all family historians is part of this mission.”

There is no charge, but space is limited. Please register for Teresa Steinkamp McMillin, CG, “Truth or Fiction: Unraveling a Family Yarn,” on 16 June 2015, 8:00 PM EDT (7:00 CDT, 6:00 MDT, 5:00 PDT) at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5110745917347890177.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

Please visit http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars to learn about BCG’s previous webinars.

CG, Certified Genealogist, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the
Board for Certification of Genealogists, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluations. The board name is a trademark registered in the US Patent and Trademark Office.

New records available to search this Findmypast Friday 12 June 2015

This week’s Findmypast Friday marks the release of over 19,000 parish records from the English county of Kent, poor law relief records from the early 18th century, a fascinating Police Gazette index and new additions to the PERiodical Source Index.

Hue & Cry Index 1797-1810

Containing over 16,000 entries, the Hue & Cry Index 1797-1810 is an index of the ‘Hue and Cry, and Police Gazette’, an English newspaper that published notices of wanted criminals and the offences they committed. The index was compiled by volunteers of the Australian Institute of Genealogical Studies and is a prime source of information on the crimes committed by convicts who were sentenced to transportation. The index contains the details of crimes committed all over Britain as well as the names of missing persons and those who had been transported or imprisoned. Each record includes a transcript that lists the offender’s name, the location of their offence, the date of the offence and the volume and page number of the original document. Further information about the individuals listed can be found using our collection of historic British newspapers. Despite having a high circulation of roughly 150,000 copies printed each issue, there is no complete set of the Hue & Cry throughout its entire print run (and various name changes). Earlier editions of the newspaper that predate the index, between 1773 and 1776, are available in Findmypast’s collection of historic newspapers under the title ‘Police Gazette’.

Surrey, Southwark, St Saviour Poor Relief 1818-1821

Surrey, Southwark, St Saviour Poor Law relief 1818-1821 contains nearly 4,000 records that list the details of individuals who applied for outdoor relief from the parish of St Saviour’s Poor Law authority. During the 19th century, each parish in Britain was responsible for looking after its poor. Indoor relief involved sending paupers off to the local workhouse while outdoor relief was given to those who were able to work, but whose wages were below the cost of living. Outdoor relief could have come in the form of clothes, food or money. Recipients were expected to work for their relief and were given a place in the workhouse if they did not. Each record includes a transcript of the original document. While many families requested relief only once, in a crisis, many others needed to continue to return to the poor law authorities for assistance and appear repeatedly in the records. Transcripts list the individual’s name, the date of their request, the amount of relief they received and reason for their request.

UK Parish Records

Over 16,000 marriage records have been added to our collection of Kent Parish Records. The latest additions come from the parishes of Queenborough, Shepherdswell, Ashford, Aldington, Birling, Chart Sutton, Snodland, Ryarsh, Kemsing, Halling and Lower Birling. Each record includes a transcript taken from the original parish registers.

Over 2,700 records of Banns have been added to our collection of Kent Parish Records. The latest additions come from the parishes of Birling, Brenchley, Ryarsh, East Sutton, Borden and Lower Halstow.

Findmypast’s existing collection of over 2.8 million Staffordshire parish records are now available to browse. The Staffordshire parish registers were released in July 2014 and consists of Baptism, Marriage, Banns and Burial records held by the Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Archive Service.

Persi monthly Update

Over 430 new images have been added to The PERiodical Source Index (PERSI), the world’s largest and most widely used subject index for U.S. genealogy and local history literature. Over the past thirty years, the Allen County Public Library (ACPL) Genealogy Center has created more than 2.5 million searchable records in PERSI, indexing every article from more than 8,000 different periodicals. These include magazines, newsletters and journals, according to location, topic, surname, ethnicity and methodology. Most of PERSI’s articles are from periodicals covering the United States and Canada, but you can also find thousands of genealogy and local history entries (in both English and French) from Britain, Ireland and Australia.

The latest new additions were made to existing titles within the index. Additional years have been added to the American Genealogical Record, American Pioneer, Collections Historical and Archaeological Relating to Montgomeryshire and Its Borders, Missouri Historical Review, Nova Scotia Historical Society Collections, Now and Then, Oregon Historical Quarterly, Our Home: A Monthly Magazine, Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Ulster Journal of Archaeology and the Yorkshire Genealogist.

Remember to check our dedicated Findmypast Fridays page every week to keep up to date with the latest new additions.

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online genealogy. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field of family history and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Mocavo, Genes Reunited, The British Newspaper Archive amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over two billion family history records, from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and doing detailed historical research.

In April 2003 Findmypast was the first to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States.

BCG Honors Bamman and Melchiori with Emeritus Status

At the May meeting, the trustees of the Board for Certification of Genealogists honored two former associates who had long and distinguished careers with Emeritus status. “The Board is building on the foundations and on the contributions of our former associates,” said BCG president Jeanne Larzalere Bloom. “We are pleased to grant Emeritus status to Gale Williams Bamman and Marie Varrelman Melchiori. We are grateful for their years of service, their contributions to the genealogical community, and their deep experience and expertise.”

With 42 years of dedication to BCG’s goals and standards Bamman was the longest actively-credentialed associate. Over this time, she has held the credentials CGRS, CALS, CG, and CGL, and published in major journals. She served as BCG president and labored mightily in founding, chairing, and setting the tone for the Critique Review Committee beginning in 2005. She published articles in major journals and is now devoting her time to finishing a long-term book project.

Melchiori was first certified as CGRS in 1980. In the thirty-five years since, she consistently worked as a full-time researcher and lecturer, dutifully recertifying every five years and earning her CGL certification in 1995. Over that time she also served BCG in many roles, most notably acting as an unofficial bridge between BCG and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) from the 1980s to the present, promoting BCG to NARA, and serving as “the voice of federal records” to the genealogical community. She has taught at the National Institute for Genealogical Research since 1987, and taught military research at the Institute for Genealogical and Historical Research and the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy. She served as BCG trustee 2000-2006 and as a director of the Association of Professional Genealogists 1991-1999. APG conferred on her the Graham Thomas Smallwood Jr. Award of Merit in 1999. She was also active as a volunteer with NARA and the National Genealogical Society. Her articles for the NGS Magazine included coverage of Confederate, FBI, and War of 1812 records.

For questions or more information contact: Nicki Birch, CG, at office@BCGcertification.org.

CG, Certified Genealogist, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.