Month: July 2015

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, July 31, 2015

This week’s Findmypast Friday marks the release of over 27,000 fascinating British Army Military School records from both England and Ireland. This week’s additions also include over 92,000 historic Irish Newspapers articles, substantial updates to the PERiodical Source Index (PERSI) and the ability to browse our collection of Norfolk parish registers.

British Army schoolchildren and schoolmasters 1803-1932

Containing over 27,000 records, British Army schoolchildren and schoolmasters 1803-1932 list the details of students and staff members at the Royal Military Asylum (RMA) in Chelsea and the Royal Hibernian Military School (RHMS) in Dublin. Both schools were founded by Royal Warrant during the Napoleonic wars to educate the orphans of British servicemen in the regular army. Upon reaching the age of 14, students, both male and female, were meant to leave the institution. Boys who chose not to enlist in the army and female students were placed in indentured apprenticeship programs. Not all apprenticeship appointments were local and several pupils were sent as far as Barbados and India.
The collection covers several individual record sets and each entry consists of a transcript of the original source material. RHMS records include information about students outside the normal admission details, such as whether they went on to enlist, what trade they were taught, and the name of their fathers’ regiments. A staff list from 1864 is also available to search. RMA records include apprentice ledgers covering 1803 to 1840 and enrolment ledgers of Army Schoolmasters covering 1847 to 1876. The RMA also kept ledgers of the offences and the corresponding punishments that were doled out to misbehaving students. Punishment Ledgers for 1847 are also available to search.

Royal Hibernian Military School admissions 1847-1932

Containing nearly 10,000 records, Royal Hibernian Military School admissions 1847-1932 is a subset of British Army schoolchildren and schoolmasters 1803-1932. The records pertain specifically to students enrolled at the Royal Hibernian Military School in Dublin, Ireland. The School was opened at the end of the Seven Years War in 1769 by the philanthropic Hibernian Society with 90 boys and 50 girls in attendance. It was established in order to educate the orphaned children of members of the British armed forces in Ireland. The RHMS merged with the Duke of York’s Royal Military School in 1924.

Many of the school’s records were stored in London and destroyed during the London blitz in 1940. Surviving admissions registers are now in The National Archives and have been transcribed by Peter Goble. Each record consists of a transcript of the original source material. Admissions Include information about students outside of normal admission details, such as whether they went on to enlist, what trade they were taught, and the name of their fathers’ regiments. There are also names of various pupils captured from the 1911 Irish census and a staff list taken in 1864.

Norfolk parish registers browse

The ability to browse through more than 300 years of parish registers has just been added to our collection of Norfolk parish records. Containing more than 5,300 pages of baptism, marriage, bans, and burial records from Church of England parishes, the Norfolk registers date back to 1538 and pre date civil registration.

Most of the records are handwritten so you may find incorrect spellings or find them hard to read. Some registers have suffered damage over the centuries so some pages may be water or heat damaged – or even nibbled by mice. The information recorded has varied over the years, but parish records can provide more information than simply confirmation of the event. Information also varies according to which event is being recorded.

Irish Newspaper Update

Over 92,000 new articles and two brand new titles have recently been added to our collection of historic Irish Newspapers. The new titles, the Missionary Herald of The Presbyterian Church in Ireland and the Tyrone Constitution, cover over 25 years of 19th century history in Ireland, dating as far back as 1844 and up to 1871. Substantial updates have also been made to existing titles, including over 6,000 additional articles from the Dublin Evening Mail.

PERSI Quarterly Index Update

Over 85,500 new article indexes have recently been added to the PERiodical Source Index (PERSI). The indexes added cover an impressive range of years, with some dating as far back as the 1500s and others right up to present day. PERSI is the world’s largest and most widely used subject index for U.S. genealogy and local history literature. Most of PERSI’s articles are from periodicals covering the United States and Canada, but you can also find thousands of genealogy and local history entries (in both English and French) from Britain, Ireland and Australia.

Remember to check our dedicated Findmypast Fridays page every week to keep up to date with the latest new additions.

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online genealogy. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field of family history and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Mocavo, Genes Reunited, The British Newspaper Archive amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over two billion family history records, from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and doing detailed historical research.

In April 2003 Findmypast was the first to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, July 24, 2015

This week’s Findmypast Friday marks the release of over 113,000 new Australian convict records covering Victoria, New South Wales, Queensland and the Island of St Helena. A 1714 list of over 3,000 British Army Officers who were receiving half has also been released as well as a census of the Irish Army taken during the Irish Civil War in 1922.

Australian Criminal Records


Containing over 2,000 records, the Victoria, Convict register 1842-1854 is made up of several lists relating to the administration of convicts in the Port Phillip District. The region was administered by the colony of New South Wales until, on 1 July 1851, it separated to become the Colony of Victoria. Although no convicts were transported directly to Port Phillip, many ended up in the region as servants or workers assigned to government projects. Others entered from New South Wales or Tasmania as ticket-of-leave holders seeking work. Each record includes an image of the original document and a transcript. The amount of information listed may vary but most will include the convicts name, year of transportation, the ship they arrived on, details of their sentence and details of either their assignment or ticket of leave.

The New South Wales, Convict Death Register 1828-1879 contains the details of nearly 7,000 convict deaths as reported to the Principal Superintendent of Convicts (until 1855), and subsequently the Inspector General of Police. Each record contains a transcript and black and white image of the original document. Records list the deceased Convicts name, age, date of burial, place of burial, the ship they arrived on and any additional remarks.

The Queensland Convict register index 1824-1839 contains the details of over 2,600 convicts held at the Moreton Bay convict settlement. Moreton Bay was established in 1823 as a place of secondary punishment for convicted prisoners who committed further crimes in the Port Jackson region. Around 2,400 men and 145 women lived in the Bay’s convict depots under the control of military commandants who were required to maintain registers for regular submission to the Colonial Secretary in Sydney. Each record is a transcript of the original source documents. Transcripts can include details of the prisoner’s offence and sentence, their prisoner number and physical description as well as biographical details such as their place of birth, year of birth and religion.

Containing over 10,000 records, the Queensland, St Helena Convict Index 1863-1936 lists the details of convicts held at the penal colony on the Island of St Helena. St Helena is located 2.5 miles east of the mouth of the Brisbane River in Moreton Bay and was named after an after an aboriginal named Napoleon was exiled there in 1826. It later became home to a quarantine station that became one of the most profitable prisons in the State’s history, housing prisoners under sentence of hard labour. Conditions were so harsh that it became known as “the hell hole of the Pacific” or “Queensland’s Inferno”. Each record is a transcript taken from original source documents. Transcripts can include the prisoner’s name, their prisoner number, the year their name was taken as well as page, ID and reference numbers for the original documents held by the Queensland State Archives.

Australia Convict Tickets of Leave 1824-1874 contains over 60,000 records. A ticket of Leave was a form of bail or licence that allowed prisoners to build a new life in Australia before the official end of their sentence. The system was introduced informally in 1801 to reward convicts who had performed a service or been of particularly good conduct and allowed them to work for themselves, marry, or to have their families join them. Tickets had to be renewed yearly and carried at all times. Ticket holders were also expected to regularly attend religious services, prohibited from leaving the colony and barred from carrying firearms. The records in this collection consist of three different types of document held by the Government of New South Wales: Registers of tickets of leave 1824-1833, Ticket of leave butts 1827-1875, and New South Wales, butts of convicts’ certificates of freedom 1827-1867. Each record contains a transcript and black and white image of the original document that can include the prisoners name, where they were born (convicts came from all over the British Empire), their offence, occupation, a physical description and where they were allowed to settle.

New South Wales, butts of convicts’ certificates of freedom 1827-1867 contain nearly 32,000 records. Certificates of Freedom were awarded to convicts after they completed a fixed term of sentence, allowing them to go free and choose whether to settle in Australia or return home to their country of their origin. Certificates were only available to prisoners serving a fixed term sentence, usually 4, 7 or 14 years, and not to those serving life sentences. Each record contains a transcript and a black and white image of the original document. Earlier certificates show the bare details of name, sentence and ship while later certificates give much greater detail including occupation or calling, native place and distinguishing physical marks. They may also note whether or not the convict previously held a ticket of leave, which would allow him limited freedom before the end of his sentence.

Irish Army Census 1922

Containing over 32,000 records, the Irish Army Census 1922 is comprised of ten volumes held by the Military Archives of Ireland. The census lists the names of all those serving with the army at midnight on 12/13 November 1922 and was imposed to help with administrative challenges faced by the new Army Pay Office. The National Army was established in 1922 following the signing of the Anglo-Irish treaty and the end of the Irish War of Independence. The first recruits were pro-Treaty supporters within the Irish Republican Army though records show that a number of later recruits were as young as 14 years old. The census will be an invaluable resource as it was taken shortly after the Four Courts fire had destroyed thousands of records. The census is also of historical significance as it was taken during the Irish Civil War (1922-1924). Each record includes a transcript of the details found in the original records and a link to the image on the Military Archives website. Each transcript includes a soldiers name, age, birth year, place and county. Images will reveal further details such as their division, rank, attestation details, home address and next of kin.

British Army, List of Half-pay Officers 1714

The British Army, List of Half-pay Officers 1714 contains the details of over 3,000 Officers from over 116 different regiments within the British Army. Half-pay referred to the pay or allowance an officer received when in retirement or not in actual service. Many of those listed would have served in the War of Spanish Succession (1701 to 1714). The Treaty of Utrecht, signed at the end of the War, reduced the size of the British Army by almost 50 regiments. This left a high number of officers displaced. Retirement for an officer was not available until 1871 so many went on half-pay, allowing them to retain their commissions and remain available for any future service. The index was created by Wienand Drenth. Each record includes a transcript of the original source material that lists the Officers name, rank, regiment and establishment (English or Irish).

Remember to check our dedicated Findmypast Fridays page every week to keep up to date with the latest new additions.

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online genealogy. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field of family history and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Mocavo, Genes Reunited, The British Newspaper Archive amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over two billion family history records, from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and doing detailed historical research.

In April 2003 Findmypast was the first to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States.

Ancestry.com LLC Reports Second Quarter 2015 Financial Results

– Second Quarter Revenues $169.4 million, Up 8.5% Year-Over-Year; Up 10.2% on Constant Currency Basis — Second Quarter Adjusted EBITDA $67.3 million, Up 16.1%Year-Over-Year1 -PROVO, Utah, July 22, 2015 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ancestry.com L…

American Ancestors Special Event: Explore your Essex ancestry

Tracing Your Essex Ancestorswith the Essex Record OfficeMonday, August 3 9:30 am-4:30 pm99-101 Newbury Street, Boston MAAdmission: $35Since the 17th century, there have been strong connections between the county of Essex in England and the New World. B…

AncestryDNA and Calico to Research the Genetics of Human Lifespan

Collaboration Will Analyze Family History and Genetics to Facilitate Development of Cutting-Edge TherapeuticsPROVO, Utah and SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., July 21, 2015 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — AncestryDNA, an industry leader in consumer genetics, and Calico…

Jewish Synagogue Seatholder records go online

TheGenealogist has released online 99,500 records of London synagogue seat-holders spanning the years from 1920 to 1939.

  • Covering the records from 18 Synagogues around London with many connected guilds, societies and charities etc.
  • Additional information found in these records include names of gentlemen eligible for office, life member of the council, women who are seatholders in their own right and seatholders who are not eligible to vote.
  • Fully searchable by name, keyword, synagogue and address, the Jewish Synagogue Seatholders has been extracted from various years of: “Seatholders for Synagogues in London”

Those with Jewish ancestors from London will welcome this fascinating new release from TheGenealogist. Revealing details of positions held by forebears, researchers will be able to track ancestors who became wardens, council members, or served on committees of their synagogue, as well as seatholders in synagogues from around the capital city. These fully indexed records allow family historians to search by name, keyword, synagogue and address and with one click see an image taken from the pages of Seatholders for Synagogues in London.

The records include some synagogues that are no longer in existence; for example the Great Synagogue that once stood at Duke’s Place and which was destroyed in the Blitz.

Nigel Bayley, MD of TheGenealogist said: “These records will allow you to search for Jewish relatives amongst the London synagogue seatholders, it is now easier than ever to discover any official positions that your jewish ancestor held.”

An example follows below…

Lionel Nathan de Rothschild, OBE (25 January 1882 – 28 January 1942) can be found in these records. De Rothschild was an English banker and a Conservative politician who was well known as the creator of Exbury Gardens near the New Forest in Hampshire. He was the eldest of the three sons of Leopold de Rothschild (1845–1917) and Marie née Perugia (1862–1937) and a part of the illustrious Rothschild banking family of England.

On 25 January 1910 he was elected to the House of Commons for the constituency of Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire – his grandfather and namesake had been the first practicing Jew to be able to take up his seat in Parliament.

His father, Leopold, died in early 1917 and Lionel and brother Anthony became the managing partners of N M Rothschild & Sons bank. However, Lionel de Rothschild had developed an interest in horticulture at a very young age and is said to have planted his first garden at the age of five. In 1919, he purchased the Mitford estate at Exbury in Hampshire where he devoted a great deal of time and money to transform it into one of the finest gardens in all of England with more than one million plants building Exbury House around an existing structure in a neo-Georgian style. Although he continued to work at the family bank, he is quoted as describing himself as “a banker by hobby — a gardener by profession”. Lionel Nathan de Rothschild died in London, aged sixty, in 1942 and was buried in the Willesden Jewish Cemetery.

Logging into TheGenealogist and selecting Jewish Synagogue Seatholders from the dropdown menu, we enter Lionel as a forename and De Rothschild as the surname. We can filter the results by date. This returns us several positions that De Rothschild held in three different synagogues in London, including the Warden of the Great Synagogue that once stood in Duke’s Place, north of Aldgate, until it was destroyed in the London Blitz. We can also see that he was the President of the United Synagogue in North Finchley. Selecting that record allows us to view the actual image of the page from the Seatholders for Synagogues in London 1920.

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR Tuesday, July 21: “Diamonds in the Rough: Finding and Using Manuscript Collections”

Manuscript collections can be a genealogist’s secret weapon. Learn to find and use them!

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (“BCG”) will present a webinar on this subject free to the public at 8:00 PM EDT 21 July 2015. Shellee A. Morehead, Ph.D., CG, will describe collections of unique unpublished materials that may be hiding in plain sight, and how to access them online and in person — including maps, photographs, diaries, letters, scrapbooks, genealogists’ research notes, unpublished histories, business ledgers, journals, vertical files, and other one-of-a-kind documents and objects that may provide insight into our families’ lives and neighborhoods.

Seating is limited for this webinar. Please register early and sign in early to avoid disappointment.

The BCG is an independent certifying body and author of the 2014 Genealogy Standards.

Shellee Morehead, CG, has a Ph.D. in evolutionary ecology and she has extensive research, writing, and teaching experience. She researches, writes, and lectures on family history. Her most recent article is “Thomas Hamilton — Progenitor of a Colonial American Family: His Ulster Origins Revealed using DNA” in the Ulster Historical Foundation’s annual Directory of Irish Family History Research. Her recent speaking events include The Genealogy Event in New York. Her specialties include Rhode Island, Italian, and French-Canadian research and genetic genealogy. Shellee is a member of the Rhode Island Genealogical Society, the American-French Genealogical Society, and the Association of Professional Genealogists (APG).

“We are pleased to offer this informative webinar,” said BCG president Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG. “The Board for Certification of Genealogists strives to foster public confidence in genealogy by promoting an attainable, uniform standard of competence and ethics. Educating all family historians is part of this mission.”

There is no charge, but space is limited. Please register for Shellee A. Morehead, “Diamonds in the Rough: Finding and Using Manuscript Collections” before 21 July 2015 at:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1093371223246598658.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

Please visit http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars to learn about BCG’s previous webinars.

CG, Certified Genealogist, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluations. The board name is a trademark registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

One Week. 100,000 Online Volunteers. Time to “Fuel the Find!”

Millions of Family History Discoveries Likely from Worldwide Event

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, July 22, 2015—A record-setting 100,000 online volunteers are expected to participate in the second annual Worldwide Indexing Event, facilitating millions of discoveries for eager family history researchers. Scheduled for August 7–14, the event will show how anyone with a computer and Internet connection can help “Fuel the Find” by making information from historical documents easily searchable online.

What Does It Mean to “Fuel the Find”?

Indexed (transcribed) historical records are like the fuel that powers genealogical search engines such as FamilySearch.org, enabling people to find missing or unknown branches in their family trees. Beyond simple name searches, indexed records also allow FamilySearch.org to provide patrons with highly relevant and accurate hints, essentially bringing the records of their ancestors to them automatically. Every name that a volunteer indexes from a historical record adds another drop of precious fuel that can ultimately help someone easily and quickly find a missing ancestor.

International Language Emphasis

Already one of the largest and most successful volunteer transcription programs in history with more than 1.3 billion records indexed since 2007, FamilySearch indexing is looking toward this year’s event to launch an expanded push for indexed records in languages other than English. Currently FamilySearch.org offers 20 times more searchable records in English than in all other languages combined. To balance this ratio, people with fluency in other languages, especially French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish, are being sought as indexing volunteers.

“Family history research in English-speaking countries is a dream compared to research in other parts of the world,” said Mike Judson, manager of FamilySearch’s indexing workforce development. “Our goal is to make research for our friends in other lands as joyful and productive as it is in the United States, Great Britain, and other English-speaking countries. To do this we need tens of thousands of volunteers with well-developed language skills to step forward and use those talents to bless others’ lives. We have the records—now we just need the hands.”

To help volunteers with language skills to get started, FamilySearch indexing has launched carefully chosen indexing projects in its four focus languages of French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish. Special training guides are now available to help new and experienced English indexers with skills in these languages to quickly familiarize themselves with how to index these particular records.

New One-Week Record Anticipated

Last year’s Worldwide Indexing Event established a one-week record of 91,721 participants. This year, more than 100,000 participants are expected. To be counted, each volunteer must submit at least one indexing or arbitration batch sometime during the week. Volunteers and potential volunteers can visit FamilySearch.org/indexingevent2015 to learn more, including strategies for avoiding high demand periods that may tend to slow down the indexing system.


© 2015 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. A service provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saint

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

New Records Reveal Previously Unknown Mormon Pioneers


Salt Lake City, UT—In a collaboration between the Church History Library and FamilySearch, individuals can now discover and explore more of their pioneer heritage on the newly redesigned Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel website that also includes information about previously unknown pioneers. In addition to discovering your pioneer ancestors, new features enable people to read their ancestors’ personal journals, see available photos, and learn key details about major events in their ancestors’ lives.

Since the site was first launched, an influx of pioneer documentation has allowed historians to reconcile and expand their understanding of the trek west. The site now includes information about more than 57,000 individuals in 370 pioneer companies, with thousands of original trail excerpts that are authoritatively documented. “This is an extremely significant database,” said Keith Erekson, Church History Library Director. “It reveals so much about individual pioneers and their experiences, but it also offers fresh new insights about their collective experience.” Site updates include the ability to submit family photographs of pioneers and to link to digital copies of sources on the Internet. There are also new articles of interest, including humorous stories from the trail.

Individuals have two options for accessing the site. Through FamilySearch.org/pioneers, your personal FamilySearch family tree will be polled for matches in the updated pioneer database. Through history.lds.org/overlandtravels you can explore known pioneers and companies and lots of other interesting facts and documentation about this exciting period of Mormon and Western history.

Millions of people continue to be inspired by the courage, faith, and triumphs of the Mormon pioneers. Many of us are unknowingly modern pioneers, whose courage, personal achievements, and applied faith will be equally inspiring to future posterity and generations. This updated site will be featured in the international “I Am a Pioneer” social media campaign (#IAmAPioneer) that will encourage individuals today to see themselves as modern-day pioneers and recognize the need to readily capture their stories of triumph online for future generations. Learn more about this initiative at FamilySearch.org/iamapioneer.

Those without Utah pioneer ancestry may be interested in reading stories of pioneers worldwide by visiting the Church History Department’s website, history.lds.org/section/pioneers.

Bring your genealogical data to life by discovering the stories and photos of your ancestors or the ancestors of others. Visit the newly updated Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel website today.

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 130 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Findmypast Friday: Highlights from the Crime & Punishment collection, and new Newspapers and Anglo-Boer War Records

This week’s Findmypast Friday includes even more illuminating Crime and Punishment-related collections, in addition to updates to our Anglo-Boer War update and Newspaper Collection. Our incredibly detailed new prison records can shed light on a convict’s life with details which go far beyond their identity and sentence. Pore over photograph albums and trial calendars, and delve into journals from governors, chaplains and surgeons…

Treasury Departmental Accounts Convict Hulks (TNA Ref: T 38/310-338)

Treasury Departmental Accounts Convict Hulks contains over 158,250 records from the accounts held by the Treasury Department for the various convict hulks around England.

They contain quarterly accounts covering the hulks Bellerophon, Justicia, Captivity, Laurel, Leviathan, Portland, Retribution, Prudentia, Stanislaus and Savage between 1804 and 1831 as well as departmental accounts from 1558 to 1937.

Home Office and Prison Commission: Prisons records (PCOM 2)

Containing over 632,000 records, PCOM 2 consists of a variety of documents concerning prisons and prisoners held by the Prison Commission and the Home Office. The records cover prisons all over England and Wales, including Pentonville, Chatham, Portsmouth, Millbank and Wormwood Scrubs prisons.

There are also records for Gibraltar prison, army prisoners held in the Savoy prison in Middlesex and a number hulks. The collection offers an incredibly detailed look at an individual convict’s life in prison, going far beyond the details of their conviction and prisoner number.

British Newspaper update

Our British Newspaper Collection has grown by over 800,000 new articles, and now stands at over 126.5 million fully searchable articles from 358 local, regional and national newspaper titles from around England, Scotland and Wales.19 new titles have been added, and 17 existing titles have been supplemented with additional articles.

Anglo-Boer War update

Almost 900 new records have just been added to our collection of Anglo-Boer War Records, 1899-1902. This unique database of more than 470 sources records the details of individual soldiers who served in the British Army during the Second Boer War.

The entire register now contains over 293,000 records, including a list of over 59,000 casualties. Each record includes a transcript of the original source material that can include information such as name, service number, rank, regiment and honours.

Remember to check our dedicated Findmypast Fridays page every week to keep up to date with the latest new additions.

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online genealogy. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field of family history and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Mocavo, Genes Reunited, The British Newspaper Archive amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over two billion family history records, from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and doing detailed historical research.

In April 2003 Findmypast was the first to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States.

Ancestry Launches AncestryHealth

Dr. Cathy Petti Joins as Chief Health Officer to Spearhead Company’s Global Health InitiativesAncestryDNA Database Surpasses One Million People GenotypedPROVO, Utah, July 16, 2015 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ancestry (www.ancestry.com), the leader in family hi…

everyStory, New Cloud-Based Story-Sharing Platform, Launches Open-Beta on iPad


Interactive photo-album platform aims to preserve memories by saving photos and audio for generations to come

SAN DIEGO (July 1, 2015) everyStory, a new cloud-based story-sharing platform, launches today. This one-of-a kind tool is now available for iPad devices during open-Beta and can be downloaded in the App Store. everyStory allows users to store audio and image files to a secure cloud-based system with the option of sharing photos and stories between other everyStory individuals and groups.

“I created everyStory after being diagnosed with colon cancer and realizing my son may never remember my voice or hear my stories. I am passionate about providing people with an innovative way to preserve and share memories forever in the most interactive way possible,” said Dave Keene, CTO of everyStory. “My love for family history dates back to my childhood, but the urgency of needing to save those memories amplified when I unfortunately and prematurely loss two of my closest loved ones. Soon after my first daughter was born and my motivation to make a product like everyStory available to everyone was immediate,” said Ed Cox, CEO of everyStory.

Users can import photos from a computer, iOS photo album or scan physical photos directly into the app using a device camera. The platform integrates a social network component by encouraging users to tag photos with people, and/or by location, subject or date. To create an interactive photo-album, everyStory lets multiple users record an audio message, on the same photos, in a shared album or within a group. Users can simply tap a tagged person’s name to hear the story that is connected to a specific photo or album.

everyStory is free for everyone throughout open-Beta. Thereafter, the company will offer free and premium memberships suitable for anyone’s file storing needs. The free membership allows users to store up to 500 photos coupled with unlimited audio recording storage. everyStory’s referral program allows free members and the referred new user to receive space for an extra 100 photos. Unlimited audio and photo storage is offered with the premium membership, $3.99 per month or $39.99 annually, along with access to exclusive content.

The everyStory team has plans to add more capabilities to the platform in the coming months and will create versions suitable for other devices and operating systems.

For more information on everyStory, please visit: http://www.everystory.us. To download and sign up for everyStory, please visit the App Store.

About everyStory

everyStory is a cloud-based story-sharing platform that acts as an interactive photo-album on a mobile device (currently available for iPad devices) allowing users to have access to audio and picture files anywhere, anytime. This multi-faceted system is equipped to record all audio from the storyteller/user as they naturally flip through photos. Users can safely share with individuals and groups of their personal choosing who can then contribute new photos to existing stories or new stories to existing photos. everyStory is passionate about creating the most optimal privacy-focused micro-social network that archives important memories through long-term cloud storage.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday 10 July 2015

This week’s Findmypast Friday highlights two fascinating sets of Criminal Petitions and nearly 7,000 Judges Reports on Criminals released early this month as part of our England and Wales Crime, Prisons and Punishment collection. Over 94,000 British Army, Northumberland Fusiliers records and 1831 census fragment records covering the parish St Julian’s in Shrewsbury are also available to search.

Registers of Criminal Petitions (HO18)

The Registers of Criminal Petitions HO 18 contain just over 19,000 further records. Some petitions have additional documents attached, such as returns of convicts recommended for early release by the governor, newspaper cuttings and other documentation. It is worth browsing through the connected images as some petitions are quite lengthy documents that will give details of family circumstances and the grounds on which they are hoping to appeal their sentence.

Registers of Criminal Petitions (HO19)

Containing over 77,000 records, the Registers of Criminal Petitions (HO 19) consists of registers of correspondence relating to criminal petitions. The records include copied letters that often refer to previous correspondence which may or may not have survived and will usually give the outcome of the appeal. The registers also note the criminals place of imprisonment.

Judges Report on Criminals (HO47)

Containing almost 7,000 records, Judges Report on Criminals (HO 47) is comprised of transcripts and images of foliated handwritten letters and reports from judges on cases and criminals and include petitions for free pardons and reductions and commutations of sentences. The records within this set are name rich as defendants, judges, witnesses and victims are all named. They are also of significant genealogical value as details of the family circumstances were often recorded as grounds for clemency.

British Army, Northumberland Fusiliers 1881-1920

Over 94,000 records have been added to our collection of British Army, Northumberland Fusiliers 1881-1920 records. The transcripts were created by Graham Stewart using information taken from over 70 sources including medal rolls, service records, medal index cards, battalion histories and St George’s Gazette, and the regimental paper. They list the details of men who served with the regiment during the Fourth Ashanti War (1895-1896), Sudan, Boer War, North West Frontier and the First World War. The Northumberland Fusiliers were formed in 1674 as the 5th Regiment of Foot. By the First World War the regiment was the second largest infantry regiment in the British Army. Each record consists of a transcript that can include the soldiers name, residence rank, battalion, enlistment, transfer and discharge details and any additional notes.

Shropshire, Shrewsbury St Julian’s parish, 1831 census

The Shropshire, Shrewsbury St Julian’s parish, 1831 census contains over 630 records from the ecclesiastical parish of St Julian in Shrewsbury, Shropshire. The 1831 census was the fourth census to take place in Great Britain and covered England, Scotland and Wales. It was created on 30 May 1831 and only recorded the names of the head of each household. Each record includes a transcript and image of the original document held by the Shropshire Archives. As well as listing the names, addresses and marital status of each head of household, the records can also reveal the number of buildings and families they were responsible for, the number of servants within their household, whether families worked in agriculture, trade or otherwise and the number of men, women and youths under the age of 20.

Remember to check our dedicated Findmypast Fridays page every week to keep up to date with the latest new additions.

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online genealogy. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field of family history and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Mocavo, Genes Reunited, The British Newspaper Archive amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over two billion family history records, from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and doing detailed historical research.

In April 2003 Findmypast was the first to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States.

Children’s Author Seeks Supporters for Ancestry Focused Work

The People Who Made Me - Troy Hallewell



Phoenix, AZ, July 9th, 2015 — Troy Hallewell, author of “The People Who Made Me”, a children’s illustrated poem on the subject of ancestry, is seeking supporters with the goal of raising the capital necessary to cover the expenses of hiring a professional illustrator and publishing the work.

“There aren’t a large number of titles about ancestry that parents and grandparents can read to their loved ones. I brainstormed and wrote “The People Who Made Me” in response to this shortage” says Troy Hallewell, the author behind “The People Who Made Me”.

With the advent of what some are calling the ‘E-book Revolution’, sales of children’s books have increased over the last three consecutive years. Compared to other forms of fiction, children’s books are up almost 2% more than their industry peers. In spite of a rosy outlook in children’s books one sub genera where they don’t seem to be picking up as much speed is the ancestry/family history genera. This genera seems to be losing out to more colorful book themes and plots.

“The People Who Made Me” is trying to make family history and personal ancestry… well, personal, to both parents and their children. It’s my goal that with professional and colorful pictures depicting exciting scenes that children will come to the decision that learning about ‘the people who made (them) is certainly worthy of a bedtime story” says Hallewell.

With the goal to raise the capital necessary to cover art and printing expenses, Hallewell has turned to a new platform for group fundraising. Kickstarter.

“Our Kickstarter campaign is looking to raise $2000 from people that are interested in seeing family history and personal ancestry becoming a stronger genera in children’s publishing. People can support our cause and help turn this great poem into a successful children’s book with pledges as low as just one dollar” says Hallewell.

The URL of the Kickstarter project is:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/763002278/the-people-who-made-me-illustrated-childrens-book

Guild of One Name Studies: The Guild’s 7,000th member

The Guild of One-Name Studies has reached another milestone. Today the 7,000th member joined the Guild of One-Name Studies.Rosemary Potter, who lives in Bournemouth, UK. This milestone follows a very successful year for the Guild of One-Name Studies in…

National Genealogical Society Enters Partnership with Findmypast to Benefit NGS Members

ARLINGTON, VA, 6 July 2015—National Genealogical Society (NGS) has made a special arrangement with Findmypast (FMP), one of the leading genealogical records companies, to provide NGS members a free, one-year subscription to Findmypast US and Canada collection.

Members can use this opportunity to extend their own FMP US and Canada subscriptions beyond their current expiration date. Also available to NGS members is a one-year subscription to Findmypast World collection at a significantly discounted rate.

Current and new NGS members are encouraged to visit the NGS website for additional details and to take advantage of this limited-time offer.

Findmypast is an international leader in online family history and genealogical research with customers and operations in the United States, United Kingdom, Ireland, and Australia. Its searchable online archive includes more than two billion family history records—from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers, the Periodical Source Index (PERSI), and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a valuable resource for building family trees and making family connections through its historical records and advanced search tools.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

More details can be found online at www.ngsgenealogy.org

New Crime, Prisons and Punishment Records available to search this Findmypast Friday

To celebrate the release of over 1.9 million new additions to our England and Wales, Crime, Prisons and Punishment records, this week’s Findmypast Friday highlights some of the fascinating record sets that are now available to search within the collection.

England & Wales, Crime, Prisons & Punishment, 1770-1935, contains the details of felons who passed through the criminal justice system in England and Wales between 1770 and 1935. The records reveal the exact nature of the crimes they committed, where and when they were tried and the sentence they received. Records can also include physical descriptions, petitions for clemency, reports on behaviour, health and education and photographic mug shots. The details of victims and government officials working within the penal system can also found within the collection.

The new additions are taken from 18 substantial and widely varied record series held by The National Archives at Kew. We will be highlighting a selection of these sets each Findmypast Friday for the duration of our Crime & Punishment month: four weeks of records, guides and stories to help you discover your family’s criminal history. Please note that all 18 sets within the collection are now available to search. The third and final phase of the collection will be released later this year.

England & Wales, Crime, Prisons and Punishment now contains over 3 million transcripts, all accompanied by scanned images of the original documents, and is the largest collection of crime and punishment records available online.

Home Office: Newgate Prison Calendar 1782-1853

The Home Office: Newgate Prison Calendar 1782-1853 contains almost 339,400 records. The Calendars were taken from printed lists of prisoners to be tried at Newgate, in London. Newgate was one of the historic seven gates of the London Wall around the City of London and has been used as a prison for debtors and felons since at least the 12th century. As well as printed lists of inmates, from July 1822 onwards the records contain manuscript additions giving the results of their trials.

Home Office: Convict Hulks, Convict Prisons and Criminal Lunatic Asylums: Quarterly Returns of Prisoners 1824-1876

Quarterly Returns of Prisoners 1824-1876 contains almost 639,600 records. The records consist of sworn lists of convicts held on board prison hulks between 1824 and 1854 as well as records of prisoners held in convict prisons and criminal lunatic asylums. The returns list the names of individual convicts with particulars as to their ages, convictions and sentences, health and behaviour.

Home Office: Criminal Entry Books 1782-1871

The Home Office: Criminal Entry Books 1782-1871 contain almost 272,950 records consisting of bound copies of letters sent out from the Home Office. They consist of correspondence and warrants of Home Office officials, and friends and relations of convicts. Warrants include pardons, reprieves and transfers of prisoners from one prison to another, or to the army or navy. Each volume also contains an index arranged by type of warrant issued.

Home Office: Old Captions and Transfer Papers 1843-1871

Home Office: Old Captions and Transfer Papers 1843-1871 contains over 3,660. The records contain copies of court orders (‘old captions’) for the imprisonment or transportation of prisoners. These are the papers written up by the trial judge and handed to the policemen who were to take the prisoner away to jail after he was convicted. All the paperwork involved in transferring prisoners is here, with individual documents for transfer between prisons and the records for that prisoner while he was in the gaol. There is a huge amount of detail in these records and it is worth browsing through all the available images to find all the separate documents concerning an individual prisoner. The later records even include a full medical history which is extremely unusual in genealogical records. There are also some records concerning prisoners serving their sentence on prison hulks.

Home Office and Prison Commission: Male Licences 1853-1887

Home Office and Prison Commission: Male Licences 1853-1887 contains almost 36,700 records of male convicts who were granted licences to be at large by the court, in other words, who were allowed out on parole. There are notes of the licences and also notes of revocation of the licence, under the Penal Servitude Acts of 1852 and 1864 endorsed on old captions, or orders of court, and, in some cases, transfer papers. The images include rich details about individual convicts such if their marital status, number of children, the name and address of their next of kin, their profession and a full physical description as well as where they went when they were released. Many records include photographic mug shots located on the last page.

Metropolitan Police: Criminal Record Office: habitual criminals’ registers and miscellaneous papers

Containing the details of over 151,330 individuals, the Metropolitan Police: Criminal Record Office: habitual criminals’ registers and miscellaneous papers consists of registers of habitual criminals kept by the police and circulated among the force on a regular basis. They include a detailed physical description noting all distinguishing marks and a full criminal record with notes on whether the convict had been apprehended. Some records are from the Police Gazette appendix which included photographs of some of the prisoners. Also included is a list of 5,824 habitual drunkards from the period 1903 to 1914, which would have been circulated weekly to licensed persons and secretaries of clubs. They usually contain two photographs of each drunkard: face on and profile.

Remember to check our dedicated Findmypast Fridays page every week to keep up to date with the latest new additions.

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online genealogy. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field of family history and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Mocavo, Genes Reunited, The British Newspaper Archive amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over two billion family history records, from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and doing detailed historical research.

In April 2003 Findmypast was the first to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States.