Month: December 2016

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, December 30, 2016

Over 972,000 new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

Over 900,000 records have been added to our collection of Irish Dog Licenses. These fantastic census substitutes cover all 26 counties in the Republic of Ireland, date back to 1866, and will allow you to find out the colour, breed and sex of your ancestor’s four legged friend.

Huntingdonshire Marriages 1754-1837 contains over 1,000 names taken from 26 volumes of marriage records from the Huntingdonshire district of Cambridgeshire. These records will allow you to discover when, where and to whom your ancestor was married.

Was your Scottish ancestor admitted to the local dispensary in the market town of Kelso? Explore registers containing over 1,700 names that list the date and outcome of patients’ treatment (such as cured, relieved of symptoms, or died).


Over 67,000 new articles and five new titles have been added to the Periodical Source Index. The new titles cover the American Historical Society, Chicago, Maryland, and British family histories & heraldry and will allow you to discover articles, photos, and other material you might not find using traditional search methods.

Midwest African American Genealogy Institute Celebrates Milestone Year!

Midwest African American Genealogy Institute Celebrates Milestone Year!



Chicago, IL-December 23, 2016 – The Midwest African American Genealogy Institute a nationally acclaimed genealogy institute is opening registration for the 5th consecutive year to individuals interested in African American Genealogy. “The Genealogy Center in Indiana, is very pleased to partner with this great institute”, said Curt Witcher, The Genealogy Center Manager at the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana. MAAGI 2017 will be held from Tuesday, July 11 to Thursday, July 13 at this world famous genealogy repository. The goal is to provide education, through research with the right resources. MAGGI fulfills an educational need in the study of African American genealogy by enhancing skills and introducing resources in African American Genealogy and Family History Research. The 2017 attendees will select a track in which they immersed themselves in a core curriculum for three days taking 12 different classes, guided by nationally recognized genealogy instructors.

  • Track 1: Fundamental Genealogy Research Methods and Strategies
    “Research, analyze, formulate the question and learn”
  • Track 2: DNA & Genealogy
    “Review, analyze, evaluate & connect DNA with the dots with your genealogy”
  • Track 3: Intermediate Genealogy: Pre & Post Slavery Era Research
    “New resources, document review and analysis”
  • Track 4: Genealogy Writing From Planning to Publication
    “Learn how to turn your genealogy into telling the story”

MAAGI is the only African American focused event offering a total of 48 classes with multiple tracks over 3 days with evening lectures, and guided personalized instruction. Since 2013, the Midwest African American Genealogy Institute (MAAGI) has provided an amazing learning experience for genealogists and researchers. The Institute, also known commonly as MAAGI has grown and has taken its place as a trusted educational and training institute.

MAAGI’s history is a unique one, having been hosted for the first three years at Harris Stowe State University, in St. Louis. Participants found that MAAGI provided genealogical training and guidance needed to expand their skills. For 2016, the MAAGI experience was hosted at one of the largest genealogy libraries in the country, Allen County Public Library (ACPL) in Ft. Wayne Indiana. The faculty was delighted to take the institute to Allen County, and this next year, participants will be able to take advantage of being at this amazing repository once again, and will be able to utilize the research opportunities while there.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, December 23, 2016

Over 56,000 new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

Gloucester Apprentices 1595-1700 contains the details of over 20,000 apprentices, masters and their relatives who were listed in the Calendar of the Registers of Apprentices of the City of Gloucester 1595-1700. Originally published by The Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, the calendar has been digitised through optical character recognition (OCR), which allows you to search images of text for your ancestor’s name or a keyword, such as your ancestor’s trade.

Each record will list the apprentices chosen trade, residence, the name of their father, the name of their master, the name of their master’s wife, the length of their term and the amount they were paid at the end of their training.

Over 36,000 new additions have been made to our collection of Kent parish records, including;

  • Over 14,000 additional baptisms
  • Over 1,000 additional banns records
  • Over 11,000 additional marriages
  • Over 9,000 additional burials

The new records date all the way back to 1538 and cover the parishes of Wrotham, Stansted, Wouldham, Southfleet, and Leybourne.

Scotland Mental Health Institutions Admissions contains over 1,000 records from over 50 mental health institutions including asylums and poorhouses.

Each record includes a transcript of an original document held by National Records of Scotland that will allow you to discover your ancestors’, birth place, birth date, former residence the institution they were sent to and the date of their admission.

Search over 17,000 transcripts of prison registers to find out if your ancestors spent time in jail between 1828 and 1884.

Each record will list your ancestors’ age, birth year, birth place, occupation, former residence, offence and place of imprisonment.

Millions more records and enhanced interface added to TheGenealogist’s Diamond subscription

Using TheGenealogist’s highly praised unique SmartSearch and its wealth of records you’ll have a better chance of finding your ancestors and adding them to your family tree.

You can benefit from all the great new records released as part of our Diamond Subscription with our specially priced Christmas Offer.

This month sees the release of:-

New High Resolution zoomable 1891 census images,
Over 4 million Emigration records,
More than 2.1 million Parish Records,
Over 1 million individuals in new Army & Navy Lists (1778-1915)
Thousands of new headstones added (Total 53,000 indexed headstone photos in 459 cemeteries.)

TheGenealogist can help you to build your family tree and locate more of your ancestors with its wealth of genealogical records that include Births, Marriages & Deaths, Census, Parish Records, Non-Conformist Records, Wills, Military Records, Education Records, Poll & Electoral Records. In addition to this you’ll also be able to use TreeView, an online family tree builder with full privacy control.

2016 Diamond Releases

Over the last year we have already added the following:

  • Over 12 million Parish records
  • Thousands of Newspapers
  • New Occupational Records
  • Early Army Records
  • Prisoner of War records
  • Colour Tithe Maps for multiple counties, with more coming in 2017
  • 220 Million US Census Records
  • Millions of US Death Records
  • Post Office Directories
  • New War Memorials
  • New Headstone Records

What’s Coming to TheGenealogist in 2017!

And in the New Year you’ll see even more New Data Sets coming to TheGenealogist

  • Millions of new and unique Parish Records
  • Bishops’ Transcripts are being added for many more counties.
  • A new and unique record set covering detailed records of our ancestors houses, which will be searchable by name, address and area, with high resolution maps showing the property.
  • Our ongoing project with The National Archives is set to release yet more detailed Colour County and Tithe Maps with tags to show where your ancestors lived.
  • 1921 census substitute, using a wide variety of records including Trade and Residential Directories of the time.
  • New decades of BT27 Passenger Lists and Emigration Records
  • Expanded International Headstone Project to cover Commonwealth cemeteries.
  • More worldwide War Memorials added to our comprehensive database.
  • Following on from our release of over 230 million U.S. records in 2016, we will be launching more U.S. records.
  • Updated high resolution image sets.

Look out for these exciting new developments and more in 2017 at TheGenealogist.co.uk

New Historic Records on FamilySearch: Week of December 19, 2016

SALT LAKE CITY, UT—Treat your family to the gift of new family history discoveries this holiday season. New historic church records were published online this week from Bolivia, Ecuador, and England, along with cemetery, census, civil registration, and probate records from Africa, South America, and France. Explore the complete interactive list of new records at FamilySearch.

About FamilySearch and Its Historic Records Access Initiative

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, December 16, 2016

Over 285,000 new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday including;

Containing over 10,000 records, British Army discharges, 60th Foot 1854-1880, will allow you to find out if your ancestor served in the King’s Royal Rifle Corps. This collection of discharge records will allow you to uncover their service number, rank, and the reason for their discharge.
The 60th Regiment of Foot saw action in the Seven Years War, Napoleonic Wars, and Peninsular War. They have served in India, Burma, Afghanistan, China, and South Africa. The men found in these records most likely fought in The Indian Mutiny (1857-1859), in Canada during the Fenian raids (1866-1867), and The Zulu War (1879).

Middlesex War Memorials contains over 21,000 transcripts of memorials from over 40 parishes across the English county of Middlesex. The collection lists the names of soldiers who died while on active service between 1845 and 1998 and covers 13 conflicts.
Each record will provide you with a transcript of the individual entry from the war memorial, as well as a full transcript of all the names that appeared alongside your ancestor. Each transcript will reveal the conflict they served in, where and when they were killed, a brief description and any additional notes. Transcripts also include links from the West Middlesex Family History Society providing greater detail about the memorial such as the memorial’s location and explanations of abbreviations.

The Queensland Passports Index 1915-1925 is an index of passport registers containing over 13,000 names. The original registers were compiled by the Collector of Customs, Brisbane, and are currently held by the National Archives of Australia. Each record includes a transcript that will reveal the year the record was taken, your ancestor’s address, the date they applied for or renewed a passport and where their intended destination.

Depending on the period covered, the registers themselves may include additional information such as passport numbers, warrant numbers, remarks and additional dates associated with the issuing of passports, and occupations. Remarks may include details about soldiers returning home from the Great War.

Explore the only surviving records from the 1841 census of New South Wales. Containing just under 11,000 names, this collection includes both fully searchable transcripts and scanned images of the original household returns, affidavit forms, and abstracts of returns that will allow you to discover where your ancestors were living in 1841.

Images of the original forms may occasionally provide you with additional information or insight such as your ancestor’s religion, occupation, or civil condition. The amount of information included will vary depending on the type of document.


Over 13,000 records have been added to our collection of British Histories and Reference Guides. The collection consists of 65 volumes on genealogy, heraldry, palaeography, geography, and more. The details gleaned from these titles will provide you with the contextual information you need to create full profiles of your ancestors and the lives they led. They will add quality to your family history and your overall understanding of British genealogy.

The subject matter varies greatly in this large collection of publications. A full list of all titles included can be found at the bottom of the search page.

BCG Announces 2017 Webinar Schedule

The Board for Certification for Genealogists is proud to announce its webinar line-up for 2017. All webinars will be broadcast by Legacy Webinars, and held on the third Tuesday of the month at 8pm Eastern. The webinar schedule is as follows:

  • 17 January – Michael Leclerc, CG, “Writing up your Research”
  • 21 February – Karen Stanbary, CG, “Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument”
  • 21 March – Rebecca Koford, CG, “Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name”
  • 18 April – Rick Sayre, CG, “The Genealogy in Government Documents”
  • 16 May – Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, “MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA with the GPS”
  • 20 June – Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, “Beating the Bushes: Using the GPS to Find Jacob Bush’s Father”
  • 18 July – Angela Packer McGhie, CG, “Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas for Further Research”
  • 15 August – LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, CG, “Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors“
  • 19 September – Tom Jones, PhD, CG, “When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion?“
  • 17 October, David Ouimette, CG, “Databases, Search Engines, and the Genealogical Proof Standard”
  • 21 November – Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG, “Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required”
  • 19 December – Judy Russell, JD, CG, CGL, “The Law and the Reasonably Exhaustive (Re)Search”

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says, “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is excited to offer this webinar series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. These webinars will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics, the BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

To register for any of these webinars, please visit our page at Legacy Family Tree Webinars: http://familytreewebinars.com/BCG.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/BCG and http://BCGcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. For more information on BCG’s education opportunities, please visit: http://familytreewebinars.com/BCG.

New Historic Records on FamilySearch: Week of December 12, 2016

SALT LAKE CITY, UT—FamilySearch added new historic records this week for Brazil, England, Ireland, Namibia, Peru, and the United States. Significant records were added to the Ireland (Valuation Office Books 1831-1856) and Freedmen’s Bureau (1865-1872) collections. Search these new records for free at FamilySearch.org.

About FamilySearch and Its Historic Records Access Initiative

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, December 9, 2016

Over 205 million new records and newspaper articles are available to search this Findmypast Friday including;

Over 204 million new articles and 8 new titles have been added to our collection of historic British newspapers. The new additions include the Northern Daily Telegraph, Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News, Britannia and Eve, The Sketch, The Sphere, Evening Star, Shipley Times and Express and the Southern Echo.


The Worcestershire Probate Index 1660-1858 contains over 51,000 records taken from four varieties of probate documents that will allow you to uncover details surrounding your Worcestershire ancestor’s last will and testament. Each record includes a transcript that will reveal when they died, their occupation and how their estate was handled.

Buckinghamshire Marriages contains over 49,000 records that will allow you to discover when, where and to whom your ancestor was married. The collection consists of transcripts covering 26 parishes within the English county of Buckinghamshire.

Was your ancestor an officiating minister in New Zealand in 1882? Find out with an index containing over 600 records and covering 13 religious denominations. Each record includes a transcript that will reveal their official title and the church they served.

Find out if you have military is memorialised in Auckland’s Waikaraka Cemetery with a memorial commemorating over 100 veterans who fought for the Empire and who died at the Auckland Veterans’ Home between 1902 and 1940. Each record includes a transcript that will list their birth year, death year, age at death and force or regiment.

Did your ancestor take the Civil Service examination in New Zealand? Explore this collection of more than 700 records and uncover the details of those who sat for the annual examinations for admission to, or promotion in, the Civil Service in mid-December 1906 and mid-January 1907.

New Historic Records on FamilySearch: Week of December 5, 2016

SALT LAKE CITY, UT—FamilySearch published free, searchable historic records online this week from Canada, England, Japan, New Zealand, the Philippines, Sweden, Scotland and the United States. Perhaps one of these collections has the ancestor you are seeking! See and search the full list of new, free collections this week at FamilySearch.

About FamilySearch and Its Historic Records Access Initiative

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

A Genealogist’s Guide to Boston, Massachusetts Released

A Genealogist's Guide to Boston, Massachusetts Released



The fourth in a series of guides to popular research destinations

The In-Depth Genealogist is pleased to present their newest book in the research series by writer, Jacqueline Gamble entitled “A Genealogist’s Guide to Boston, Massachusetts”. The book is a great resource for genealogists who plan on researching in this geographic area. Approximately 12 million people from all over the world visit Boston every year to take in its beautiful harbor, amazing history, museums, sporting events, and more. With its mixture of old buildings (some dating back to the 1600s), new skyscrapers, and everything in between, Boston truly is a meeting of past, present and future.

This guide will provide you with what you will need to know when planning a genealogy trip to Boston. Within the book is information on repositories, libraries, historical societies, cemeteries, attractions, accommodations, and more in and around Boston.

“A Genealogist’s Guide to Boston, Massachusetts” is available now as a PDF, Kindle, and Nook download ($4.99) through The In-Depth Genealogist Store (http://theindepthgenealogist.com/shop-idg/idg-products/). The paperback book will soon be available for just $9.99 in a convenient pocket sized, 5” x 8”, so it will easily fit in your bag or jacket. Subscribers to the website receive a 10% discount on purchase of the book.

Jacky Gamble is a genealogist, historian and freelance writer. She discovered her passion for genealogy while crafting a list of cousins in her very large family. She sought the help of the internet for locating missing cousins and instead discovered records of her grandparents, great grandparents, 2nd great grandparents and so much more. The more ancestors she discovered, the more she wanted to know. And thus began her love of this hobby. She has yet to finish her original list of cousins.

When Jacky is not researching genealogy, she is writing about it. She regularly posts to her personal blogs at Tracing My New England Roots (http://genealogyvt.blogspot.com/) and The Graveyard Rabbit of Vermont (http://vermontgyrabbit.blogspot.com/). Her articles have been published in various Internet publications and in Family Chronicle magazine. Jacky is the author of The In-Depth Genealogist’s column “Remembering Olde New England” in Going In-Depth magazine.

New Royal Irish Constabulary Service Records available at to search at Findmypast

  • Over 486,000 RIC service records released online
  • Thousands of new records added to existing collection of RIC histories & directories

Today, December 2nd 2016, over 530,000 Royal Irish Constabulary records have been published online at Findmypast. The release consists of one brand new collection, Royal Irish Constabulary Service Records 1816-1922, and new additions to their existing collection of Royal Irish Constabulary History & Directories.

Digitised from original records held by The National Archives, the new Royal Irish Constabulary Service Records 1816-1922 collection contains a wide variety of documents from the series HO 184.Each record includes both an image of the original document and a transcript of the information it recorded.

The collection will allow researchers from all over the world to uncover intimate details of their ancestor’s career with the RIC and consists of over 486,000 records pertaining to the running and administration of the force. This includes;

  • Auxiliary division general registers: nominal rolls that recorded member’s service number, rank, dispersed date, and company name. The registers also include division journals that recorded dates of appointment, promotions, and medical details.
  • Clerical staff: record of service and salaries: lists of clerical staff that include birth date, age at appointment, rank, department and salary.
  • Constabulary Force Funds: correspondence registers of members who paid into the fund with notes on whether they had been pensioned, died or received any rewards from the fund.
  • Constabulary lists: Lists of chief constables created during the first year of the Royal Irish Constabulary.
  • Disbandment registers: Lists of serving members who were with the force in 1922 when it disbanded after the creation of the Free Irish State. They also noted the number of years the constable served and their recommended pension.
  • General registers: Records of constables’ service history. The entries include the individual’s birth date, native county, religion, previous occupation, date of appointment, and promotions, as well as any rewards or punishments received and the date of pension or discharge.
  • Nominal returns, arranged by counties: lists of all serving members of the Royal Irish Constabulary organised by county that recorded the individual’s number, rank, name, religion, date of appointment, marital status, and station location.
  • Officers’ registers: lists of Officers that include transfers and dates, favourable and unfavourable records, dates of promotions and details of previous military service.
  • Pensions and gratuities: pension records that reveal the constable’s rate of pay and the amount of pension calculated.
  • Recruits index: Lists of new recruits, their dates of appointment and arrival, and their company.

Royal Irish Constabulary Service Records 1816-1922 also contains a variety of additional documents that record details of the Force’s daily operations. These include correspondences, intelligence notes, programmes of ceremony, constabulary codes and lists of “good men” to name but a few. Over 43,000 additional records have also been added to Findmypast’s existing Royal Irish Constabulary History & Directories collection, an archive of publications printed between 1840 and 1921 that provide further insight into the inner workings and history of the organisation.

The publication marks the latest step in Findmypast’s commitment to making Irish family history more accessible. In less than 5 years, Findmypast have made over 110 million records (with 300 million names) available online for the first time.

About The Royal Irish Constabulary

The Royal Irish Constabulary was established as a peace-keeping force dedicated to the detection and prevention of crime throughout Ireland. They also took over the responsibility of the Revenue Police to enforce the laws of whiskey production. The force trained at Phoenix Park Depot.

During the Irish War of Independence, RIC barracks were the targets of frequent attacks from the Irish Republican Army. Due to a decrease in members for reasons of death, injury, low recruitment, and resignation, the British government dispatched auxiliary forces of ex-servicemen to make up the numbers. This auxiliary force became known as the Black and Tans because of their uniform and were notorious for their brutality. The Anglo-Irish treaty ended the war on 6 December 1921 and the Irish Free State was established in January 1922. The Royal Irish Constabulary was disbanded in August 1922 and a new police force, Garda Síochána, took its place. In Northern Ireland, the police force became the Royal Ulster Constabulary.

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online family history. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Lives of the World War 1, The British Newspaper Archive and Genes Reunited, amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over eight billion family history records, ranging from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and conducting detailed historical research.

In April 2003, Findmypast was the first online genealogy site to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitized records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States. Findmypast, in association with The National Archives, recently launched the 1939 Register, a record of 41 million lives on the eve of World War II.

Registration Opens for the National Genealogical Society’s 2017 Family History Conference

Registration Opens for the National Genealogical Society's 2017 Family History Conference



ARLINGTON, VA, 1 DECEMBER 2016— Registration is now open for the National Genealogical Society’s thirty-ninth annual Family History Conference, Family History Lives Here, which will be held 10–13 May 2017 at the Raleigh [NC] Convention Center. To register on or after 1 December 2016, visit the NGS website at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/register/ and complete the online registration form.

Throughout its history, North Carolina has been home to a diverse population including Native Americans and those who trace their heritage back to Europe and Africa. During colonial times, it was one of a few colonies that embraced religious diversity, welcoming Quakers, Huguenots, Methodists, and Moravians. It is a land rich in cultural traditions. From the lighthouses on the outer banks to the falling waters on the Piedmont, to the dramatic overlooks in the mountains, this land calls us back to take a closer look. The Tar Heel story is vibrant, shared through the words of each family, and recorded in the wonderful records, manuscripts, and artifacts preserved in the numerous North Carolina archives, special collections, museums, libraries, historical sites, and societies.

With a focus on records, repositories and methodology, the conference program offers family historians numerous topics to help them advance their research. Other genealogical subjects featured at the NGS Family History Conference will include US Reconstruction, maps and locations, historical context, and research tips and techniques. Some highlights of the sessions are Deborah Abbott’s “Stories from the Back Door of the Swannanoa-Berkeley Hotel: My Family History,” Rick Fogarty’s “The Moravians and the Cherokees: From Piedmont to Tahlequah,” and Angela Packer McGhie’s “Using Identity Characteristics to Locate Your Ancestors.” A four-day DNA track features lectures on interesting developments and uses of DNA tests, and thorough analysis of the results. A workshop on chromosome mapping and a workshop on creating DNA citations and proof arguments are also planned. Single-day tracks focus on church records, military topics, and Native American research. Technology and its increasing role in research is addressed in a variety of presentations including a two-day track on tools and methods to use technology to enhance your family history research. A Skillbuilding track will again be sponsored by the Board for the Certification of Genealogists (BCG) for intermediate to advanced researchers interested in improving their research skills.

A number of special events have been planned with limited seating, so be sure to register on 1 December, or as soon as possible thereafter, if you plan to attend these events. To register online, visit the NGS website at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/register/. The online searchable program is available at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/program/ and the PDF brochure is available at https://goo.gl/uci0ec. The brochure includes an overview of the sessions, tours, pre-conference events, registration times, and rates as well as general conference and hotel details. Attendees are urged to visit the conference blog, http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/blog/, which will feature tips on local and regional research facilities, things to do in and around North Carolina, and updated information on hotel availability and local restaurants.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.