Day: May 11, 2017

National Genealogical Society Presents Awards Honoring Excellence in Newsletter Editorship and Service to NGS

National Genealogical Society Presents Awards Honoring Excellence in Newsletter Editorship and Service to NGS

ARLINGTON, VA, 10 MAY 2017—The National Genealogical Society (NGS) honored excellence in the categories of newsletter editorship and service to the Society with the presentation of several awards at the Opening Session of the NGS 2017 Family History Conference in Raleigh, North Carolina, on 10 May 2017. The Opening Session was a multi-media presentation, entitled Family History Lives Here, after which NGS President, Ben Spratling, JD, presented the following awards.

Each year, the NGS Newsletter Competition recognizes the hard work, long hours, and creativity that editors devote to their newsletters. A panel of three judges reviews each newsletter on material interest, variety, organization, quality of writing and editing, readability, and attractiveness. This year’s categories and winners are:

Family Association Newsletter:

Winner: About Towne, the newsletter of the Towne Family Association, Inc., edited by Rae Russell Johnson.

Honorable Mention: The Hungerford World Tree, the newsletter of the Hungerford Family Foundation, Inc., edited by Charles C. Morga.

County/Local Genealogical and/or Historical Society for societies with less than 500 members:

Winner: The Archivist, the newsletter of the Genealogical Society of Bergen County, New Jersey, edited by Michelle D. Novak.

Honorable Mention: The Newsletter of the Irish Family History Forum, the newsletter of the Irish Family History Forum, edited by Patricia Mansfield Phelan.

Major Genealogical and/or Historical Society for societies with more than 500 members:

Winner: Ohio Genealogy News, the newsletter of the Ohio Genealogy Society, edited by Sunny Morton.

Honorable Mention: The Virginia Genealogical Society Newsletter, the newsletter of the Virginia Genealogical Society, edited by Debbie Harvey.

NGS also recognized several individuals for their dedicated efforts in support of the NGS 2017 Family History Conference in Raleigh, North Carolina.

The Award of Honor

The Award of Honor was presented in recognition of dedication and sustained service in support of the conference. The recipient of the award was the North Carolina Genealogical Society, Inc., Victoria P. Young, President.

Certificates of Appreciation

Certificates of Appreciation were given to recognize the committee chairs who spent countless hours preparing for the conference. NGS is aware that there could be no conference if it were not for the volunteers’ efforts and commitment. So honored were the Local Host Chair, Victoria P. Young; Librarians’ Day Chair, Sue Kaufman; Librarians’ Day Co-Chair, Jennifer Crowder Daugherty; Registration Co-Chair, Terry Moore, CGSM, Registration Co-Chair, Maryann Tuck; Local Publicity Chair, Diane L. Richard; Local Publicity Committee, Phyllis Matthews Ziller; Vendor Support Chair, Diane L. Richard; Volunteer Co-Chair, Laurel Sanders; Volunteer Co-Chair, Sharon Gable, CG; Local Event Chair, Heather Whann Choplin; Hospitality Chair, Lisa Lisson; and National Publicity Chair, Terry Koch-Bostic.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

National Genealogical Society Announces the 2017 Filby Award for Genealogical Librarianship

ARLINGTON, VA, 9 MAY 2017— Larry W. Cates is the 2017 recipient of the Filby Award for Genealogical Librarianship. Cates, who is librarian at the Heritage Research Center of the High Point Public Library, High Point, North Carolina, received his award and its $1,000 prize, which is underwritten by ProQuest, at the Librarians’ Day event of National Genealogical Society (NGS) 2017 Family History Conference in Raleigh, North Carolina, also underwritten by ProQuest. The Filby Award is named for the late P. William Filby, former director of the Maryland Historical Society and author of many core genealogical reference tools that genealogists have relied on for decades. Created in 1999 by NGS, the award has been sponsored by ProQuest and Mr. William Forsyth since 2006.

Cates has been Librarian at the Heritage Research Center of the High Point Public Library since October 2007. During the course of his career, he has created innovative programs for family historians. In 2010, Cates co-founded the Heritage Book Club to introduce genealogists to the historical context in which their ancestors lived. He initiated a “Field Trip to Archives” program with the Guilford County Genealogical Society to mentor inexperienced researchers. He also has provided programs to local genealogical societies; served as journal editor for the Randolph County Genealogical Society and Guilford County Genealogical Society; and helped to promote their activities through his library’s mailing list and at genealogy fairs at his library.

Cates is equally dedicated to the preservation and cataloging of historical records. He has worked single-handedly to process and incorporate various private collections of papers into his library’s local history files. Cates also volunteered to create thorough scope and content descriptions for a sizeable body of manuscript and other textual materials housed at the High Point Museum. He is currently working to document High Point’s participation in the Great War, including a more complete roster of local participants, with African Americans who were omitted from High Point’s World War I monument. Over the years, Cates has published a wide variety of abstracts, transcriptions, and feature articles in various local and state-level genealogical publications.

From 2012- 2015, Cates served the North Carolina Genealogical Society as a director and editor of NCGS News, and North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal. He is a member of the Advisory Board of the Digital Library on American Slavery and serves as Clan Genealogist for the Clan MacRae Society of North America.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

NGS Releases Two Newly Revised Guide Books for Tennessee and North Carolina


NGS Releases Two Newly Revised Guide Books for Tennessee and North Carolina

ARLINGTON, VA, 10 MAY 2017— The National Genealogical Society (NGS) announces the publication of two newly revised books in its Research in the States series. These guides are two of 26 books that provide information about genealogical repositories and resources in specific states to aid individuals who are researching their family histories. The latest editions are Research in Tennessee, 3rd Edition and Research in North Carolina, 2nd Edition.

Research in Tennessee, 3rd Edition

In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, Tennessee was the gateway west through the Appalachians for tens of thousands, migrants. In Research in Tennessee, descendants of those who stayed and those who pushed further westward will discover a comprehensive guide to a myriad of records that will help them trace their ancestors. Written by Charles A. Sherrill, the book notes that a preponderance of records can be found at the Tennessee State Library and Archives in Nashville but it also provides up-to-date information about online sources and records found in libraries nationwide. In his discussion of the records, the author weaves in the historical context as an added aid to family historians. The records covered include atlases, gazetteers, and maps; court, land and church records; state, county and tax records; and military and pension records from the Revolutionary War through World War II. Readers will also find discussions of records on women and ethnic groups, including American Indian, African American, and Melungeon (a multi-racial group from Appalachia whose origins can be traced to the colonial era), and much more. This guide book is available in print and or PDF version. It will go on sale in the NGS online store on 10 May 2017 and will begin shipping on 22 May.

Research in Tennessee was originally written by Gale Williams Bamman, a certified genealogist emeritus and past trustee and president of the Board for Certification of Genealogists. The second edition in 2009 and this newest edition were updated and revised by Charles A. Sherrill, State Librarian and Archivist of Tennessee. A genealogist and author of twenty books on Tennessee history and genealogy, Sherrill directs operations at the Tennessee State Library and Archives. He is the editor of the Middle Tennessee Journal of History and Genealogy.

Research in North Carolina, 2nd Edition

Research in North Carolina, 2nd Edition, by Jeffrey Haines, CGSM, introduces family historians to the Tar Heel state’s records, manuscripts, and artifacts preserved in the numerous archives, special collections, museums, libraries, historical sites, and societies. North Carolina has been home to numerous ethnic groups such as the Scots Irish and Germans, covered in this guide book. Ethnic records focus on the two largest groups in North Carolina, African American and Native American. Record repositories, resources, and publications for Baptists, Moravians, and Quakers as well as religious groups that appeared later in the state’s history are described. Researchers will find helpful discussions on the history of the North Carolina court system and its laws, poll tax, and military, land, and vital statistics records. Other topics covered include military records, both state and federal, from the colonial period through the World Wars; land records, vital statistics, and the major manuscript repositories and their collections, including Duke and East Carolina universities and the University of North Carolina. This guide book is available in print and or PDF version. It will go on sale in the NGS online store on 10 May 2017 and will begin shipping on 22 May.

Jeffrey L. Haines, CG, is a professional genealogist, specializing in the families of the Carolinas and British West Indies. He is a former editor of the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, and has written articles for the NGSQ, the BCG OnBoard, and the APGQ, and other publications. He has lectured at national conferences and workshops. A former APG president, he currently serves as president of its North Carolina chapter.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

Two New Research Guides: American Indians of Oklahoma & Research in Mississippi


NGS Releases Two New Research Guides: American Indians of Oklahoma and Mississippi


ARLINGTON, VA, 9 MAY 2017— The National Genealogical Society (NGS) announces the publication of two new books in its Research in the States series. These guides are two of 26 books that provide information about genealogical repositories and resources in specific states to aid individuals who are researching their family histories. The latest releases are The American Indians of Oklahoma and Research in Mississippi.

The American Indians of Oklahoma

Written by Kathy Huber, MLS, The American Indians of Oklahoma tells the story of the sixty-seven tribes that were removed or relocated to the area once known as Indian Territory, now Oklahoma.  Their stories, revealed through tribal records, historical documents, and federal legislation, tell of heartache, challenges, and long-suffering.  Tribes include American Indians from the Northeast, like the Delaware, Shawnee, and Sac and Fox; the Comanche, Kiowa, Cheyenne, and Arapaho from the Plains; the Prairie tribes Kaw, Ponca, and Ottawa as well as the five tribes known as “civilized,” the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole. They and many others just as important have all contributed their own unique history and culture to this story told here in The American Indians of Oklahoma. This guide book is available in print and or PDF version. It will go on sale in the NGS online store on 10 May 2017 and will begin shipping on 22 May.

Kathy Huber is the genealogy librarian for the Tulsa (Oklahoma) City County Library. She also serves on the board of the Friends of the Oklahoma Historical Society Archives and is a member of genealogical and heritage societies including the DAR. Huber lectures on Oklahoma related topics at national conferences. She also has attended the Salt Lake Institute and was the 1998 recipient of the IGHR Richard S. Lackey Memorial Scholarship.

Research in Mississippi

Since the sixteenth century, Mississippi was ruled at various times by the French, British, and Spanish until it became a territory of the United States in 1798. Research in Mississippi,written by Lori Thornton, MLS, provides major research resources for each of these periods as well as a discussion of boundary changes prior to statehood. Also included are descriptions of collections found in research repositories, including Mississippi Department of Archives and History; Mississippi State University Libraries, Special Collections; University of Mississippi’s Special Collections; and McCain Library and Archives, University of Southern Mississippi. In addition, readers will find information about out-of-state repositories with major Mississippi collections such as Natchez Trace Collection at the University of Texas.  Court, land, and probate records are discussed as well as institutional records, including asylums, hospitals, and prisons. Ethnic records include African Americans, American Indians, and the Chinese communities of the Mississippi delta. Also of value is an extended discussion of genealogical and historical periodicals. This guide book is available in print and or PDF version. It will go on sale in the NGS online store on 10 May 2017 and will begin shipping on 22 May.

Lori Thornton, MLS, is associate professor of Library Services and Technical Services Librarian at Carson-Newman University’s Stephens-Burnett Memorial Library. A professional genealogist, she specializes in research in Southern states, particularly Mississippi, Tennessee, and North Carolina, and in religious records. She also is a national lecturer and author and member of a number of national and local genealogical societies.


Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.