New City of York records available to search at Findmypast


A Yorkshire Witch, the King of the Railways, a host of confectioners and the unfortunate Mr Chicken: over six centuries of life in historic York revealed online for the first time 
  • Findmypast launch new landmark collection spanning 660 years of the city’s rich history in partnerships with Explore York
  • Over 290,000 records dating back to the reign of King Edward I now available to search and explore online
  •  New records shed light on the city’s historic engineering & confectionary industries and document some of York’s most celebrated residents

Leading UK family history website findmypast.co.uk has today, 12th May 2017, published online for the first time hundreds of thousands of historic records in partnership with Explore York.

This landmark publication marks the creation of Findmypast’s York collection, a rich archive spanning the years 1272 to 1932. Comprising beautifully scanned images of original handwritten documents, the collection forms the largest online repository of historic City of York records in the world.

The collection is comprised of a variety of fascinating documents, including:

  • Hearth & window tax records – 1665-1778
  • Lists of Apprentices and freemen – 1272-1930
  • City of York trade directories
  • Electoral Registers 1832-1932
  • City of York school admission registers
  • City of York deeds registers 1718-1866
  • City of York militia & muster rolls 1509-1829
  • City of York calendars of prisoners 1739-1851

The records are full of fascinating details of York life through the ages and will provide researchers from all over the world with the opportunity to uncover the stories of the inhabitant’s one of England’s oldest cities for the very first time. Fully searchable transcripts of each original document are also included, enabling anyone to go online and search for their York ancestors by name, location and date.

Paul Nixon, Content Licensing Manager at Findmypast, said: “Findmypast already has the best collection of Yorkshire records online and we’ve now cemented this with six centuries’ worth of records from the City of York Archives. Apprentices, land-owners, prisoners, scholars, soldiers, tradesmen, and voters; we’ve covered York and its history from every angle, and we’re thrilled to have been chosen as Explore York’s partner on this important project.”

York’s rich history revealed

The collection will be of great interest to local and social historians as the records can provide incredible insights into numerous historical figures and events that shaped the county’s rich history.

Lists of Apprentices and Freemen dating back to the 13th century shed light on the history of trade and commerce within the city and record the details of a number illustrious former residents. During the 19th century, the introduction of the railways and the work of pioneers such George Hudson established engineering in the city and eventually the repair and manufacture of engines and carriages became an important industry. In 1839 a small repair shop was opened on Queen Street and within ten years it was repairing engines to the tune of £15,000 a year. The work on engines continued in York until about 1905 and many carriage builders, painters, trimmers, listers and drivers can be found in the records.

The records also reveal how the railways led to the expansion of the city’s confectionary businesses, namely Rowntree’s Cocoa Works. For a number of reasons York became a centre for the production of confectionery and cocoa in the 1800s and by the end of the century, it was second only to the railways as an employer in York. This too is reflected by large number of confectioners listed in the city Freemen records.

Historic prison records dating back to the early 18th century reveal fascinating insights into the history of crime and punishment in England. They reveal many ordinary and extraordinary stories of criminals and victims from the Georgian highway robber, the Victorian murderer and the petty thief, to the common rural poacher, unemployed petty food thief and the early trade unionist. A number of the crimes listed are truly shocking, such as the case of 11 year old Luke Wright, whose entry read: “Luke Wright, late of the parish of Rotherham, in the County of York, shoemaker, committed the 7th day of April, 1810, charged by the Coroner’s Inquest, on view of the body of Matthew Anderson, lying dead at the parish of Rotherham aforesaid, with feloniously stabbing, killing, and slaying the said Matthew Anderson.”

The York collection contains fascinating Militia Muster Rolls dating back to the reign of Henry VIII. During the 16th & 17th centuries, the militia was an important institution in English life and every parish was required to furnish a quota of eligible men. Likewise, each household was assessed for the purpose of finding weapons, armour, horses, or their financial equivalent, according to their status. The records, which list the names of eligible men and the equipment they could provide, show how the militias were mainly comprised of untrained civilians armed with primitive weapons, revealing how ill-prepared for an emergency they actually were. The records also contain the details of men who fought with Colonel Henry Waite’s Yorkshire Trained Band Regiment of Foot. Raised by Sir Henry Slingsby in 1642, this Royalist regiment was responsible for the defence of the city when it came under siege during the English Civil War.

Famous folk found in the records

Covering a wide area and timeframe, many of the city’s most famous sons and daughters can be found within the records, including;

  • Joseph Aloysius Hansom (26 October 1803 – 29 June 1882) – the prolific English architect, inventor of the Hansom cab and founder the eminent architectural journal, The Builder – In 1834 Hanson registered his design for a ‘Patent Safety Cab’ with a number of distinctive safety features including a suspended axle, larger wheels and a lower position of the cab, features that resulted in less wear and tear and fewer accidents. He went on to sell the patent to a company for £10,000; however, as a result of the purchaser’s financial difficulties, the sum was never paid.

  • George Hudson (1800 –1871) – the  English railway financier and politician who became known as “The Railway King” – Hudson played a significant role in linking London to Edinburgh by rail, carrying out the first major merging of railway companies (the Midland Railway) and developing York into a major railway junction. Hudson’s success was built on dubious financial practices and he lost everything following a series of enquiries in 1849. He was declared bankrupt and, after losing his seat in Sunderland, was forced to live abroad to avoid arrest for debt, returning only when imprisonment for debt was abolished in 1870.

  • Richard Chicken – Initially an actor, and then a clerk at various establishments, Mr Chicken is believed to have provided Charles Dicken’s with the inspiration for David Copperfield’s Mr Micawber, whose recipe for happiness – ‘Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen [pounds] nineteen [shillings] and six [pence], result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery’ – is often quoted. A well-known figure on York’s Victorian scene and a father of twelve, Chicken spent his career struggling to stay afloat and lived his domestic life, just as Wilkins Micawber did, in the expectation that something would turn up – sadly it never did!
  • Anne Ward – early female printer and proprietor of the York Courant – Ann took control of the paper following the death of her husband Caesar in 1759 and moved the press to a house next to the George Inn, in Coney Street. According to Robert Davies in his 1868 Memoir of the York Press, the Wards turned the York Courant into‘a journal of superior class to that of any York newspaper that attempted to compete with it.’ The first two pages of the York Courant were devoted mainly to foreign and national news culled from despatches arriving in London. On pages 3 and 4 city and county news, opinion, notices, letters and local gossip rubbed shoulders with a variety of advertisements.
  • Mary Bateman (1768 – 20 March 1809), also known as the Yorkshire Witch can be found within the prison records – After being dismissed as a domestic servant for petty theft, Bateman became a minor thief and con artist who convinced her victims that she possessed supernatural powers. By the late 1790’s, she had become a prominent fortune-teller in Leeds who prescribed potions which she claimed would ward off evil spirits as well as acting as medicine. She was also responsible for a hoax known as The Prophet Hen of Leeds, in which eggs laid by a hen were purported to predict the end times. In 1806 she was approached by William and Rebecca Perigo who believed they had been cursed. Over the next several months, Bateman fed the pair pudding laced with poison. Rebecca soon succumbed but William continued to pay Bateman for more than two years until he finally grew suspicious and went to the authorities. In March 1809, Bateman was tried in York and found guilty of fraud and murder. Sentenced to death, she attempted to avoid her execution by claiming she was pregnant, but a physical examination disproved this. She was finally hanged alongside two men on 20 March 1809. After her execution, her body was put on public display and strips of her skin were tanned into leather and sold as magic charm to ward off evil spirits.
  • Various members of the Tuke & Rowntree families including, Henry Isaac Rowntree, the brand’s founder, and his brother Joseph – Having served his apprenticeship in his father’s shop at The Pavement, Henry went to work for the Tuke family at their shop in Walmgate. In 1862 he bought out the chocolate, cocoa-making and chicory departments and ran the business himself employing around a dozen people, following Quaker principles and insisting on the highest quality. In August 1864 he bought a disused foundry at Tanners Moat and built a new factory there. Henry eventually became distracted by his mission to produce, edit and print the Yorkshire Weekly Press and his chocolate business suffered as a result. In June 1869 he took on his brother Joseph as a full partner in the business and renamed it “H. I. Rowntree & Co”. The brothers continued in partnership and the business went from strength to strength until Henry’s death in 1883.

All of these records can be explored at www.findmypast.co.uk/York-records 

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online family history. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Lives of the First World War, The British Newspaper Archive and Genes Reunited, amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over eight billion family history records, ranging from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and conducting detailed historical research. 


In April 2003, Findmypast was the first online genealogy site to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitized records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States. Findmypast, in association with The National Archives, recently launched the 1939 Register, a record of 41 million lives on the eve of World War II.

National Genealogical Society Presents Awards Honoring Excellence in Newsletter Editorship and Service to NGS

National Genealogical Society Presents Awards Honoring Excellence in Newsletter Editorship and Service to NGS

ARLINGTON, VA, 10 MAY 2017—The National Genealogical Society (NGS) honored excellence in the categories of newsletter editorship and service to the Society with the presentation of several awards at the Opening Session of the NGS 2017 Family History Conference in Raleigh, North Carolina, on 10 May 2017. The Opening Session was a multi-media presentation, entitled Family History Lives Here, after which NGS President, Ben Spratling, JD, presented the following awards.

Each year, the NGS Newsletter Competition recognizes the hard work, long hours, and creativity that editors devote to their newsletters. A panel of three judges reviews each newsletter on material interest, variety, organization, quality of writing and editing, readability, and attractiveness. This year’s categories and winners are:

Family Association Newsletter:

Winner: About Towne, the newsletter of the Towne Family Association, Inc., edited by Rae Russell Johnson.

Honorable Mention: The Hungerford World Tree, the newsletter of the Hungerford Family Foundation, Inc., edited by Charles C. Morga.

County/Local Genealogical and/or Historical Society for societies with less than 500 members:

Winner: The Archivist, the newsletter of the Genealogical Society of Bergen County, New Jersey, edited by Michelle D. Novak.

Honorable Mention: The Newsletter of the Irish Family History Forum, the newsletter of the Irish Family History Forum, edited by Patricia Mansfield Phelan.

Major Genealogical and/or Historical Society for societies with more than 500 members:

Winner: Ohio Genealogy News, the newsletter of the Ohio Genealogy Society, edited by Sunny Morton.

Honorable Mention: The Virginia Genealogical Society Newsletter, the newsletter of the Virginia Genealogical Society, edited by Debbie Harvey.

NGS also recognized several individuals for their dedicated efforts in support of the NGS 2017 Family History Conference in Raleigh, North Carolina.

The Award of Honor

The Award of Honor was presented in recognition of dedication and sustained service in support of the conference. The recipient of the award was the North Carolina Genealogical Society, Inc., Victoria P. Young, President.

Certificates of Appreciation

Certificates of Appreciation were given to recognize the committee chairs who spent countless hours preparing for the conference. NGS is aware that there could be no conference if it were not for the volunteers’ efforts and commitment. So honored were the Local Host Chair, Victoria P. Young; Librarians’ Day Chair, Sue Kaufman; Librarians’ Day Co-Chair, Jennifer Crowder Daugherty; Registration Co-Chair, Terry Moore, CGSM, Registration Co-Chair, Maryann Tuck; Local Publicity Chair, Diane L. Richard; Local Publicity Committee, Phyllis Matthews Ziller; Vendor Support Chair, Diane L. Richard; Volunteer Co-Chair, Laurel Sanders; Volunteer Co-Chair, Sharon Gable, CG; Local Event Chair, Heather Whann Choplin; Hospitality Chair, Lisa Lisson; and National Publicity Chair, Terry Koch-Bostic.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

National Genealogical Society Announces the 2017 Filby Award for Genealogical Librarianship

ARLINGTON, VA, 9 MAY 2017— Larry W. Cates is the 2017 recipient of the Filby Award for Genealogical Librarianship. Cates, who is librarian at the Heritage Research Center of the High Point Public Library, High Point, North Carolina, received his award and its $1,000 prize, which is underwritten by ProQuest, at the Librarians’ Day event of National Genealogical Society (NGS) 2017 Family History Conference in Raleigh, North Carolina, also underwritten by ProQuest. The Filby Award is named for the late P. William Filby, former director of the Maryland Historical Society and author of many core genealogical reference tools that genealogists have relied on for decades. Created in 1999 by NGS, the award has been sponsored by ProQuest and Mr. William Forsyth since 2006.

Cates has been Librarian at the Heritage Research Center of the High Point Public Library since October 2007. During the course of his career, he has created innovative programs for family historians. In 2010, Cates co-founded the Heritage Book Club to introduce genealogists to the historical context in which their ancestors lived. He initiated a “Field Trip to Archives” program with the Guilford County Genealogical Society to mentor inexperienced researchers. He also has provided programs to local genealogical societies; served as journal editor for the Randolph County Genealogical Society and Guilford County Genealogical Society; and helped to promote their activities through his library’s mailing list and at genealogy fairs at his library.

Cates is equally dedicated to the preservation and cataloging of historical records. He has worked single-handedly to process and incorporate various private collections of papers into his library’s local history files. Cates also volunteered to create thorough scope and content descriptions for a sizeable body of manuscript and other textual materials housed at the High Point Museum. He is currently working to document High Point’s participation in the Great War, including a more complete roster of local participants, with African Americans who were omitted from High Point’s World War I monument. Over the years, Cates has published a wide variety of abstracts, transcriptions, and feature articles in various local and state-level genealogical publications.

From 2012- 2015, Cates served the North Carolina Genealogical Society as a director and editor of NCGS News, and North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal. He is a member of the Advisory Board of the Digital Library on American Slavery and serves as Clan Genealogist for the Clan MacRae Society of North America.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

NGS Releases Two Newly Revised Guide Books for Tennessee and North Carolina


NGS Releases Two Newly Revised Guide Books for Tennessee and North Carolina

ARLINGTON, VA, 10 MAY 2017— The National Genealogical Society (NGS) announces the publication of two newly revised books in its Research in the States series. These guides are two of 26 books that provide information about genealogical repositories and resources in specific states to aid individuals who are researching their family histories. The latest editions are Research in Tennessee, 3rd Edition and Research in North Carolina, 2nd Edition.

Research in Tennessee, 3rd Edition

In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, Tennessee was the gateway west through the Appalachians for tens of thousands, migrants. In Research in Tennessee, descendants of those who stayed and those who pushed further westward will discover a comprehensive guide to a myriad of records that will help them trace their ancestors. Written by Charles A. Sherrill, the book notes that a preponderance of records can be found at the Tennessee State Library and Archives in Nashville but it also provides up-to-date information about online sources and records found in libraries nationwide. In his discussion of the records, the author weaves in the historical context as an added aid to family historians. The records covered include atlases, gazetteers, and maps; court, land and church records; state, county and tax records; and military and pension records from the Revolutionary War through World War II. Readers will also find discussions of records on women and ethnic groups, including American Indian, African American, and Melungeon (a multi-racial group from Appalachia whose origins can be traced to the colonial era), and much more. This guide book is available in print and or PDF version. It will go on sale in the NGS online store on 10 May 2017 and will begin shipping on 22 May.

Research in Tennessee was originally written by Gale Williams Bamman, a certified genealogist emeritus and past trustee and president of the Board for Certification of Genealogists. The second edition in 2009 and this newest edition were updated and revised by Charles A. Sherrill, State Librarian and Archivist of Tennessee. A genealogist and author of twenty books on Tennessee history and genealogy, Sherrill directs operations at the Tennessee State Library and Archives. He is the editor of the Middle Tennessee Journal of History and Genealogy.

Research in North Carolina, 2nd Edition

Research in North Carolina, 2nd Edition, by Jeffrey Haines, CGSM, introduces family historians to the Tar Heel state’s records, manuscripts, and artifacts preserved in the numerous archives, special collections, museums, libraries, historical sites, and societies. North Carolina has been home to numerous ethnic groups such as the Scots Irish and Germans, covered in this guide book. Ethnic records focus on the two largest groups in North Carolina, African American and Native American. Record repositories, resources, and publications for Baptists, Moravians, and Quakers as well as religious groups that appeared later in the state’s history are described. Researchers will find helpful discussions on the history of the North Carolina court system and its laws, poll tax, and military, land, and vital statistics records. Other topics covered include military records, both state and federal, from the colonial period through the World Wars; land records, vital statistics, and the major manuscript repositories and their collections, including Duke and East Carolina universities and the University of North Carolina. This guide book is available in print and or PDF version. It will go on sale in the NGS online store on 10 May 2017 and will begin shipping on 22 May.

Jeffrey L. Haines, CG, is a professional genealogist, specializing in the families of the Carolinas and British West Indies. He is a former editor of the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, and has written articles for the NGSQ, the BCG OnBoard, and the APGQ, and other publications. He has lectured at national conferences and workshops. A former APG president, he currently serves as president of its North Carolina chapter.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

Two New Research Guides: American Indians of Oklahoma & Research in Mississippi


NGS Releases Two New Research Guides: American Indians of Oklahoma and Mississippi


ARLINGTON, VA, 9 MAY 2017— The National Genealogical Society (NGS) announces the publication of two new books in its Research in the States series. These guides are two of 26 books that provide information about genealogical repositories and resources in specific states to aid individuals who are researching their family histories. The latest releases are The American Indians of Oklahoma and Research in Mississippi.

The American Indians of Oklahoma

Written by Kathy Huber, MLS, The American Indians of Oklahoma tells the story of the sixty-seven tribes that were removed or relocated to the area once known as Indian Territory, now Oklahoma.  Their stories, revealed through tribal records, historical documents, and federal legislation, tell of heartache, challenges, and long-suffering.  Tribes include American Indians from the Northeast, like the Delaware, Shawnee, and Sac and Fox; the Comanche, Kiowa, Cheyenne, and Arapaho from the Plains; the Prairie tribes Kaw, Ponca, and Ottawa as well as the five tribes known as “civilized,” the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole. They and many others just as important have all contributed their own unique history and culture to this story told here in The American Indians of Oklahoma. This guide book is available in print and or PDF version. It will go on sale in the NGS online store on 10 May 2017 and will begin shipping on 22 May.

Kathy Huber is the genealogy librarian for the Tulsa (Oklahoma) City County Library. She also serves on the board of the Friends of the Oklahoma Historical Society Archives and is a member of genealogical and heritage societies including the DAR. Huber lectures on Oklahoma related topics at national conferences. She also has attended the Salt Lake Institute and was the 1998 recipient of the IGHR Richard S. Lackey Memorial Scholarship.

Research in Mississippi

Since the sixteenth century, Mississippi was ruled at various times by the French, British, and Spanish until it became a territory of the United States in 1798. Research in Mississippi,written by Lori Thornton, MLS, provides major research resources for each of these periods as well as a discussion of boundary changes prior to statehood. Also included are descriptions of collections found in research repositories, including Mississippi Department of Archives and History; Mississippi State University Libraries, Special Collections; University of Mississippi’s Special Collections; and McCain Library and Archives, University of Southern Mississippi. In addition, readers will find information about out-of-state repositories with major Mississippi collections such as Natchez Trace Collection at the University of Texas.  Court, land, and probate records are discussed as well as institutional records, including asylums, hospitals, and prisons. Ethnic records include African Americans, American Indians, and the Chinese communities of the Mississippi delta. Also of value is an extended discussion of genealogical and historical periodicals. This guide book is available in print and or PDF version. It will go on sale in the NGS online store on 10 May 2017 and will begin shipping on 22 May.

Lori Thornton, MLS, is associate professor of Library Services and Technical Services Librarian at Carson-Newman University’s Stephens-Burnett Memorial Library. A professional genealogist, she specializes in research in Southern states, particularly Mississippi, Tennessee, and North Carolina, and in religious records. She also is a national lecturer and author and member of a number of national and local genealogical societies.


Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

REGISTRATION IS OPEN FOR PMC 2017 – WASHINGTON, DC!

The Association of Professional Genealogists is pleased to announce the opening of registration for the 2017 Professional Management Conference to be held 29 September through 1 October at the DoubleTree by Hilton-Crystal City in Arlington, Virginia. Here is the link: https://www.apgen.org/conferences/index.html.

WHY ATTEND THE PMC?

The Professional Management Conference is the one conference dedicated to the needs of professional genealogists, providing education on business topics as well as advanced genealogical education on unique record sets, methodology, DNA, and more. The conference offers three tracks over three days with classes, workshops, poster sessions, and discussion groups–all conveniently located in the conference hotel, the DoubleTree by Hilton-Crystal City, Arlington, VA.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Thirty-eight presentations, six poster sessions, and four discussion groups will educate and inspire you on a wide range of topics essential for professional development and success.

Click here for the conference schedule and registration page: https://www.apgen.org/conferences/index.html.

And learning doesn’t only take place in the breakout rooms. Join us at the Thursday, September 28, evening Dessert Reception for a fast-paced round of Speed Dating for Professional Genealogists. You are guaranteed to break the ice with many other attendees in this fun event and make new friends for the rest of the conference and beyond. Daily luncheon programs also provide opportunities to meet and network with your colleagues.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

The PMC is designed for any level of professional – whether you’ve been taking clients for years or are just creating your business. Experienced professionals appreciate this opportunity to take the time for investing in themselves and re-connecting with colleagues, while new professionals can learn how to set themselves up for success and make valuable connections.

Here is what some attendees said about last year’s conference:

“A smorgasbord of education, networking, camaraderie, and fun for every level of Professional Genealogist – all bundled with some really awesome door prizes!” –Sharon Miller

“At the 2016 PMC in Fort Wayne, every time I turned around there were another hal–dozen people I wanted to talk to!” – Harold Henderson, CG

“The 2016 APG PMC was the best I’ve attended. I had the opportunity to learn from colleagues about marketing, as well as finding missing people and DNA. And the networking opportunities were wonderful as well. I look forward to seeing you all in 2017.” – Leslie Brinkley Lawson, Forensic Genealogist Credentialed(SM)

WASHINGTON, DC

Come early or stay after the conference: with the National Archives, Library of Congress, and DAR Library just a short tempting Metro ride away, you can be sure you’ve maximized your investment of time and money by joining your colleagues at the 2017 PMC. The Pentagon Metro stop is a walkable three blocks from the DoubleTree hotel, or you can take the free hotel shuttle to the Metro. The National Archives Metro stop is an eight-minute ride away.

HOW DO I REGISTER?

Click here for registration and to make your hotel reservation: https://www.apgen.org/conferences/index.html.

CAN I REGISTER FOR ONE DAY?

Yes, one-day registrations are available

WHAT IF I CAN’T MAKE IT THIS YEAR?

The Virtual PMC brings the conference to you! All sessions in the Harrison/Wilson Room (the middle column on the program schedule) will be live streamed for Virtual PMC attendees and recorded for purchase after the conference. Details for the Virtual PMC will be announced shortly.

QUESTIONS?

Email the PMC Coordinator at pmc@apgen.org.

About the Association of Professional Genealogists

The Association of Professional Genealogists (www.apgen.org), established in 1979, represents more than 2,700 genealogists, librarians, writers, editors, historians, instructors, booksellers, publishers and others involved in genealogy-related businesses. APG encourages genealogical excellence, ethical practice, mentoring and education. The organization also supports the preservation and accessibility of records useful to the fields of genealogy and history. Its members represent all fifty states, Canada and thirty other countries. APG is active on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.