WikiTree Announces 100,000 Signatures on Honor Code



100,000 Signatures on Wiki Genealogist Honor Code
November 9, 2017: This week, WikiTree’s Honor Code surpassed 100,000 digital signatures.

“The Honor Code is our community’s ‘secret sauce’,” according to WikiTree founder Chris Whitten. “It enables our collaboration to be productive and enjoyable. It’s why our our tree grows stronger and more accurate every year, instead of just larger.”

The Honor Code lays out the WikiTree community’s shared ethics and principles. Its nine simple points establish basic rules for open collaboration, respect for copyrights and privacy, the acknowledgement of other researchers, and the importance of citing sources. https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Special:Honor_Code

Family members and genealogists with guest accounts don’t need to sign the Honor Code to enjoy the fruits of WikiTree. The community’s mission is to grow a single family tree and thereby make it free and easy for anyone to access their genealogy. However, not everyone is interested in the serious genealogical research and careful collaboration that is required for growing the tree. This is why active contributors are required to sign the Honor Code.

“The Honor Code lays the foundation for collaborative genealogy to work its wonders, as seen every day on WikiTree,” says member Michael Stills.

WikiTree: The Free Family Tree has been growing since 2008. Community members privately collaborate with close family members on modern family history and publicly collaborate with other genealogists on deep ancestry. Since all the private and public profiles are connected on the same system this process is helping to grow a single, worldwide family tree that will eventually connect us all and thereby make it free and easy for anyone to discover their roots. See https://www.WikiTree.com

New from A.J. Jacobs~ “It’s All Relative” — plus a gift!

The following was just received from our Cousin A.J. Jacobs.
Hello Friends, Colleagues and Family (though everyone fits into that third category, as you’ll see),
I wanted to let you know that my new book “It’s All Relative” comes out today! And I also wanted to give you a little something for free just because you’re my distant-but-beloved cousin.
Let me say, I’m absurdly excited to have this book out in the world so that you can finally read it.
So far, the reviews have been delightfully flattering, such as….
A real treat” (Booklist), “delightful” (Kirkus Reviews), “required reading” (Real Simple), “fascinating and funny” (CBS News), “entertaining… and lively” (Publishers Weekly), “the most original and entertaining book you’ll ever read about family” (bestselling author Mary Roach) and “why is Zane listed first in the acknowledgments?” (Lucas Jacobs, my 11-year-old son.)
The book is partly a memoir about my eccentric family. It’s also partly about the revolutions in DNA and family trees and the huge effect they’re having on politics, race relations and happiness. And it’s partly an adventure in which I try to put on the biggest family reunion in history, The Global Family Reunion. Because, as the book demonstrates, we’re all related. We are all cousins. Family is the ultimate social network.
It’s All Relative” features black sheep, celebrity cousins (Daniel Radcliffe! John Legend!), separated-at-birth twins, genealogy obsessives, plenty of Mormons, a family with nine fathers, an African-American daughter of the revolution, the real Adam and Eve, kissing cousins and friendly Neanderthals, among much more.
It’s also a heartfelt argument against tribalism, which I believe is the biggest problem facing the world today. This idea of “us vs. them” is killing us. We need to remember that we share 99.9 percent of our DNA with all other humans. A Harvard study from last year showed that Israelis and Palestinians treated each other with more kindness when they were shown how closely they were related.
My website has a list of other press, including a People magazine feature that ran this week on me. And the image below is a link to a CBS This Morning piece where you can see me (and also my kids in the background enjoying green room croissants).
Here are some ways to support the book, if you’re moved.
You can buy it! Right now!
You can leave a review on the book page on AmazonGoodreads, or wherever else you like to share and talk about books.
There’s also Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram in case you forgot they existed. People enjoy photos of other people holding books!
And now for the free part:
The book features an Appendix that gives you a How-To Guide to finding the best info about your own family. I’m offering this appendix to you now for free, in case you’re interested. It’s co-written by professional genealogist Eowyn Langholf. No obligation!
Thank you.
Your cousin, A.J.

Fold3 – New Title Added

This mount in “featured content”Canada, Certificates of Military InstructionCome look for your Canadian ancestors in our collection “Canada, Certificates of Military Instruction,” which includes records from 1867 to 1932.In 1864, a Militia General Orde…

Over 1.3 million new Portsmouth records available to search this Findmypast Friday

Over 1.3 million new Portsmouth records available to search this Findmypast Friday
Findmypast publishes the archives of the Portsmouth History Centre online for the first time
Findmypast has today, 27th October 2017, published online for the first time more than 1.3 million historical records in partnership with the Portsmouth History Centre. The publication marks the first phase of Findmypast’s new Portsmouth collection, a rich archive spanning the years 1538 to 1917 comprising beautifully scanned images of original handwritten documents. When complete, the collection will be the largest repository of Portsmouth family history records available online.
Made up of a variety of fascinating documents including parish baptisms, marriages, burials and Workhouse records, the collection will continue to grow as additional Portsmouth records including electoral rolls, rate books, crew lists and World War One military exemption records are added in later phases.
The records are full of fascinating details of Portsmouth life through the ages and will provide researchers from all over the world with the opportunity to uncover the stories of the inhabitants of the UK’s only island city for the very first time. Fully searchable transcripts of each original document are also included, enabling anyone to go online and search for their Portsmouth ancestors by name, location and date.
Councillor Richard Blunt, the county council’s cabinet member for heritage, said: “We are delighted that so much of our county’s rich history and many of its people’s stories will be better known through our partnership with Findmypast. For the first time, records will be readily accessible, in full colour, throughout the world.”
Paul Nixon, Content Licensing Manager at Findmypast, said: “The Romans were arguably the first to recognise Portsmouth’s strategic importance, and Findmypast is honoured to have been chosen as Portsmouth City Council’s family history partner. We very much look forward to sharing our discoveries with a worldwide audience as we bring these important records to life.”

The parish registers held at Portsmouth History Centre pertain to Church of England parishes in the deaneries of Portsmouth, Gosport, Fareham, and Havant. Workhouse records consists of admission and discharge (Creed) registers spanning the years 1879 to 1953. Due to privacy concerns there is a 100-year closure period for all records.

Search over 555,000 original Portsmouth Parish Baptisms to find out. Each result will include both a transcript and an image of the original document. Transcripts will reveal your ancestor’s birth date, baptism date, baptism place, residence and the names of both parents, including mother’s maiden name. You may be able to glean additional details from the original register entry so be sure to view the image attached to each transcript.
Add another branch to your family tree by uncovering the details of your Portsmouth ancestor’s spouse with over 379,000 parish marriage records. Search transcripts of these original parish registers to discover when your ancestor married, where they were married and the name of their spouse. Records will also reveal the couples’ birth years, residences, occupations, marital statuses, marriage type (banns or license), the names of both their and fathers and their father’s occupations. Images of the original register are also included with each result and may reveal additional information such as the names of any witnesses or the minister who performed the ceremony.
Discover the final resting place of your Portsmouth ancestors with over 312,000 brand new parish burials. Each record includes both a transcript and an image of the original document. Transcripts will list your ancestor’s death date, residence, occupation, burial date and burial location. Most will also reveal their residence, occupation and religious denominate as well as the names of their parent’s, spouse or next of kin.
Browse through 873 volumes of original parish registers of baptisms, marriages and burials. The majority of these registers pertain to Anglican records, but there are a few that relate to other denominations: Congregational, Presbyterian, Roman Catholic, Unitarian, United Methodist, and Wesleyan Methodist. All denominations were required to register life events with the established church until 1837.
Were your ancestors admitted to the workhouse on Portsea Island? Explore over 60,000 admission and discharge registers spanning the years 1879 to 1953 and uncover details of the relief they received. Each record includes both an image and a transcript of the original document. Transcripts will reveal when your ancestor was admitted, when they were discharged and their home address. Images may be able to offer you additional details such as religious denomination, informant’s name, and any additional written notes.